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Corvette Racing to Introduce Corvette C6.R in GT2 Class at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course

Rob

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Corvette Racing to Introduce Corvette C6.R in GT2 Class at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course

Next-Generation Race Cars Strengthen Links Between Competition and Production Corvettes

DETROIT- Corvette Racing will open a new chapter with the competition debut of the next-generation Corvette C6.R at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course on August 6-8. In anticipation of a single GT class in 2010, Corvette Racing will test and develop the latest Corvette C6.R in the GT2 category in the final five rounds of the 2009 American Le Mans Series. With the upcoming move to a unified GT category, the twin Compuware Corvette C6.R race cars will compete against rivals representing Ferrari, Porsche, BMW, Aston Martin, Jaguar, Viper, Panoz, and Ford.

Based on the Corvette ZR1 supercar, the next-generation Corvette C6.R has even stronger links to the production version of America's performance icon than its predecessors. The GT2 rules require the use of many production-based components, expanding the opportunities for the two-way transfer of technology between the race track and the showroom. The updated Corvette C6.R utilizes the ZR1's body design, aerodynamic package, aluminum frame and chassis structure, steering system, windshield, and other components. The race team has prepared the cars for the rigors of endurance racing with safety and performance modifications as permitted by the GT2 rules.

"One of the many benefits of the Corvette Racing program has been the opportunity to demonstrate the technology transfer between the race car and the production car," said Mark Kent, GM Racing manager. "The global movement toward a single GT class will allow us to compete head-to-head with more marketplace competitors while increasing both the production content of the Corvette C6.R race cars and the relevance of racing to our customers. This is a step that positions Corvette for the future of production-based sports car racing worldwide, and a move that is perfectly aligned with GM's marketing and business objectives in racing."

Previous versions of the Corvette C5-R and C6.R race cars have dominated the GTS and GT1 categories in the last decade, winning 77 races and eight consecutive ALMS championships. The GT1 Corvettes were retired following Corvette Racing's sixth victory in the 24 Hours of Le Mans on June 14, 2009.

"In our decade in GT1, our primary focus has been on racing victories and the validation of the Corvette as a world-class sports car," said Tadge Juechter, Corvette chief engineer. "As an authentic way to communicate to knowledgeable customers, nothing beats racing. As a cost-effective means to improve vehicle performance, nothing beats racing. These are the reasons racing is in Corvette's DNA.

"Behind the scenes, the race team and the production car team have grown closer together, finding numerous ways to support each other and to make both cars better," Juechter said. "Most automotive companies give lip service to claims like 'racing improves the breed' or 'race on Sunday, sell on Monday'. For team Corvette, it is a daily reality. It is now impossible to imagine one team without the other."

The upcoming GT regulations required a comprehensive redesign of the Corvette C6.R package. In place of the GT1 Corvette's steel frame, the GT2 version utilizes the production ZR1's hydroformed aluminum frame as the foundation for a fully integrated tubular steel safety cage. The GT1 version's wide, louvered fenders are replaced by production-based ZR1 fenders with wheel flares. In accordance with the aerodynamic regulations, the rear wing is reduced 25 percent in width, the diffuser is a flat panel without fences or strakes, and the splitter extends only as far as its production ZR1 counterpart. Steel brake rotors have replaced the carbon discs used previously, and the wheels are aluminum instead of magnesium. The adjustable steering column and steering rack are sourced from the street Corvette.

"Integrating a steel safety cage that meets GM Racing's stringent standards as well as the strength and durability targets required in racing is a challenge with an aluminum frame," explained Corvette Racing engineering director Doug Louth. "Working in conjunction with the structure and chassis engineers in the Corvette production group, we designed, built and tested numerous examples before we finalized the configuration. We went through a similar process with the production Corvette group on the body design and aero components. It was truly a collaborative effort between the production engineers and the race team."

In the remaining races in 2009, the Corvette race cars will be powered by 6.0-liter GM small-block V8s that are based on the 7.0-liter LS7.R that powered the GT1 version. This reduction in displacement was achieved by shortening the crankshaft stroke from 3.875-inch to 3.32-inch. The diameter of the series-mandated intake air restrictors was decreased from 30.6 mm to 28.6 mm, with a corresponding reduction in engine output from 590 to 470 horsepower. A 5.5-liter production-based GM small-block V8 is currently under development and will be introduced at the start of the 2010 season. The Corvette Racing team is continuing its commitment to green racing with the use of E85R ethanol racing fuel.

While much of the hardware has changed, Corvette Racing's roster of championship-winning drivers remains the same. Johnny O'Connell and Jan Magnussen will share the No. 3 Compuware Corvette C6.R, and Oliver Gavin and Olivier Beretta will drive the No. 4 Compuware Corvette C6. R. They will be joined by Antonio Garcia and Marcel Fassler at Petit Le Mans.

Corvette Racing also has the continued support of its long-time sponsors and technical partners. Compuware is the team's primary sponsor, with Mobil 1 supplying low-friction lubricants and Michelin providing its world-class racing tires. Corvette Racing's sponsors also include XM Satellite Radio, UAW-GM, Genuine Corvette Accessories, Bose, Motorola, PRS Guitars, and BBS.

"Compuware leads the world in application performance solutions, and partnering with Corvette Racing gives us another high-tech, high-performance and high-impact platform for communicating to our customers and prospects," said Compuware Chairman and CEO Peter Karmanos, Jr. "The launch of the Corvette C6.R in GT2 is a great extension to our relationship with General Motors, Chevy and Corvette. We look forward to even more victories in the months ahead."

The GT2-spec Corvettes were designed, built and tested on a compressed schedule. The program was approved and announced in September 2008, and construction of the first chassis began in early December. The first track test was conducted at Road Atlanta on April 8-9, followed by single-car tests in Elkhart Lake, Wis., and Sebring, Fla.

"The Corvette Racing team had to take on several challenges simultaneously to execute this program," said Doug Fehan, Corvette Racing program manager. "We were preparing for our regular race season with the GT1 cars while designing the GT2 version. The cars were being built and tested in the midst of our preparations for Le Mans. The team was multi-tasking to the extreme, operating on a leaner budget and a faster timeline. It was a monumental effort to have these cars ready for the Mid-Ohio race."

Advanced technology tools enabled Corvette Racing to meet the challenge. "With the short development schedule, we relied on 'virtual' design and computer simulation more than ever before," said team manager Gary Pratt. "We made design, engineering and manufacturing simultaneous processes as much as possible. For example, while the first chassis was being built, we continued to run computer simulations on suspension geometry and refined the aerodynamics using CFD (computational fluid dynamics) because these areas didn't have to be finalized until later in the production timeline. We have developed the capabilities to do finite element analysis and composite fabrication in-house, which has accelerated our design and production cycle.

"We're not running for a championship this year, so we're looking at the upcoming races as preparation for 2010," Pratt said. "Our only testing from this point on will be at the races, and we'll be doing it in the public eye. Certainly we hope to achieve the same level of success that we did in GT1, but the caliber of the competition we will face in GT2 is very high. When we started in GT1 in 1999, it took a while to win; now we have 10 years of experience that should help us to become competitive in a new category. Everyone at Corvette Racing is looking forward to the challenge."

Fehan is confident but cautious about Corvette Racing's prospects in the GT2 category: "In the limited testing we've done so far, we've been very impressed with the car's durability, reliability and performance," he said. "We'll continue to focus on those three factors in the upcoming races. We view the rest of this year as a development cycle, and we believe that our experience as a team in preparation, race strategy, and pit stop execution should allow us to be competitive even if there is a slight performance disparity."

The GT2 version of the Corvette C6.R will make its debut in the Acura Sports Car Challenge at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio. The two-hour, 45-minute race is scheduled to start at 3 p.m. EDT on Saturday, August 8. ABC will televise the race tape-delayed at 2:30 p.m. EDT on Sunday, August 9.

About General Motors: General Motors Company, one of the world's largest automakers, traces its roots back to 1908. With its global headquarters in Detroit, GM employs 235,000 people in every major region of the world and does business in some 140 countries. GM and its strategic partners produce cars and trucks in 34 countries, and sell and service these vehicles through the following brands: Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, GM Daewoo, Holden, Opel, Vauxhall and Wuling. GM's largest national market is the United States, followed by China, Brazil, the United Kingdom, Canada, Russia and Germany. GM's OnStar subsidiary is the industry leader in vehicle safety, security and information services. General Motors Company acquired operations from General Motors Corporation on July 10, 2009, and references to prior periods in this and other press materials refer to operations of the old General Motors Corporation. More information on the new General Motors Company can be found at General Motors | Corporate Website | GM.
# # #
Contact:
Rick Voegelin
Chevy Racing Communications
Office: 831 761-2201
Mobile: 831 320-4860
rickvoegelin@compuserve.com
 
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Rob

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1990 Corvette ZR-1
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Charting the Changes: GT1 vs. GT2 Corvette C6.R

The following is an overview of the differences and similarities between the GT1 and GT2 versions of the Corvette C6.R.
<table border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"> <tbody><tr> <td valign="top" width="197"> </td> <td valign="top" width="197">GT1 Corvette C6.R
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">GT2 Corvette C6.R
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Homologation Model
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Corvette Z06
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Corvette ZR1
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Frame
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Hydroformed steel
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Hydroformed aluminum
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Wheelbase (in)
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">105.7
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Same
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Length (in)
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">178.7
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">176.2 (-2.5)
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Width (in)
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">78.7
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">78.6 (-0.1)
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Weight (lb)
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">2580
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">2745 (+165)
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Engine
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">7.0-liter LS7.R
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">2009: 6.0-liter LS7.R
2010: 5.5-liter GM V8
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Horsepower
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">590
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">2009: 470 (-120)
2010: TBD
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Torque (lb-ft)
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">640
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">2009: 535 (-105)
2010: TBD
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Intake Air Restrictor (mm)
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">30.6
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">28.6 (-2.0)
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Bore diameter (in)
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">4.180
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Same
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Crankshaft stroke (in)
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">3.875
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">3.32 (-0.555)
</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
<table border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"> <tbody><tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Transaxle
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Xtrac 6-speed sequential
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Same
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Wheels
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">BBS magnesium, 18 x 12.5 (front); 18 x 13 (rear)
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">BBS aluminum, dimensions same
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Tires
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Michelin racing tires
300/32-18 (front)
310/41-18 (rear)

</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Same
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Brakes
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Carbon rotors and pads
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Steel rotors, ceramic composite pads
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Fuel capacity @ ALMS E85 spec (gal)
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">29
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Same
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Wing Chord (mm / in)
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">400 / 15.74
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">300 / 11.81 (-100 / -3.93)
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Diffuser
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Leading edge at rear axle centerline, with side plates and longitudinal fences
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Leading edge at rearmost point of wheel opening, no side plates or fences
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Splitter (mm)
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">80
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">25 (-55)
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Telemetry
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Yes
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">No
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Windshield
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Polycarbonate
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Production laminated glass
</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
# # #
Contact:
Rick Voegelin
Chevy Racing Communications
(831) 761-2201
rickvoegelin@compuserve.com
 
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Rob

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1990 Corvette ZR-1
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Corvette Racing White Paper: Inside the Next-Generation Corvette C6.R

Technical Insights on Corvette Racing's Production-Based GT Race Car

DETROIT - Corvette Racing is moving toward the future of production-based sports car racing with the introduction of the next-generation Corvette C6.R race car. With international regulations converging around a single GT class, Corvette Racing will continue its motorsports heritage by racing against manufacturers and marques that Corvette competes with in the marketplace. This white paper highlights the design and development of the latest version of the Corvette C6.R and spotlights its technical features.

The second-generation Corvette C6.R is the successor to the championship-winning C5-R and C6.R race cars that have dominated the GTS and GT1 categories in the last decade. Corvette Racing retired its GT1 Corvette C6.R race cars following the team's sixth victory in the 24 Hours of Le Mans on June 14, 2009. Corvette Racing will compete in the GT2 category of the American Le Mans Series for the remainder of the 2009 season, starting at the series' sixth round at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course on August 8. During this transition, Corvette Racing will test and develop the next-generation C6.R race cars in anticipation of a unified GT class in 2010.

PRODUCTION-BASED PLATFORM

The next-generation Corvette C6.R race car has strong ties to its production counterpart. Under the leadership of the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO) and the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA), the Corvette Racing program's key objectives include reducing costs, encouraging independent teams to purchase and race Corvettes, and reinforcing the relevance of racing technology to production vehicles.

Doug Fehan, Corvette Racing program manager: "Key elements in the decision to move to the new class were the strong visual and mechanical similarities between production Corvettes and the racing Corvettes, along with the increased production content in the GT2 race car. Corvette is a technological development platform for GM, and this move provided the opportunity to design and develop technology and components that would be relevant to future Corvettes and other GM vehicles. This connection drew the race team even closer to the production Corvette group and gave us new areas to explore together."

Tadge Juechter, Corvette chief engineer: "Behind the scenes, the race team and the production car team have grown closer together, finding numerous ways to support each other and to make both cars better. Most automotive companies give lip service to claims like 'racing improves the breed' or 'race on Sunday, sell on Monday'. For team Corvette, it is a daily reality. It is now impossible to imagine one team without the other.
"The move to GT2 only strengthens the trajectory we were on. The Corvette race and production teams will grow even closer together, and so will the cars. Having more commonality will increase the synergies in the development process. Facing our market rivals on the track will be a thrill for race fans and strong evidence that potential sports car customers should buy a Corvette. I am confident that endurance racing in GT2 will be an enormous benefit to our customers and to General Motors."

GT2 HOMOLOGATION

The regulations require the Corvette C6.R race car to be based on a production vehicle. This designated vehicle then determines the specifications for homologation (acceptance and approval) of the racing version. The GT1 version of the Corvette C6.R was homologated on the production Corvette Z06. A crucial step in the design of the GT2 version of the Corvette C6.R was the selection of the Corvette ZR1 as the basis for its homologation.

Doug Louth, Corvette Racing engineering director: "Early in the design process we had to decide whether to use the base Corvette coupe with its steel chassis and narrow bodywork or the Corvette Z06 or ZR1 models, which have an aluminum chassis and wider bodywork. We ran a number of simulations and CFD studies comparing the wide versus narrow bodies and looked at various track width options. In the end, the data favored the wider car, even at a high-speed, low-drag track like Le Mans. Fortunately that aligned with the marketing objective to showcase the ZR1 as the Corvette that offers the highest level of performance."

ZR1 ROOTS

The Corvette ZR1 is an American supercar that has won accolades for its extraordinary performance and exceptional value. While the GT rules preclude the use of the ZR1's supercharged 638-horsepower LS9 small-block V8 engine, they do permit the race car to take full advantage of the ZR1's aerodynamic enhancements that were developed in concert with Corvette Racing. The production Corvette ZR1 has wide carbon fiber front fenders with dual vents, a full-width rear spoiler, and a front fascia splitter - features designed to enhance high-speed stability and driver control.

Fehan: "The ZR1 uses a different splitter and a different rear spoiler than other Corvette models, and both of these enhance the Corvette C6.R's aerodynamic performance. The ZR1 was conceived as a 200 mph road car and it was developed with input from Corvette Racing. Race team engineers worked with Corvette chief engineer Tom Wallace and his successor, Tadge Juechter, providing track data and CFD simulations that had been done on the race cars. Working together they were able to develop an effective and balanced aero package for the Corvette ZR1.

"The Corvette C6.R race car is now virtually identical to the Corvette ZR1 street car in appearance. The rules in GT1 allowed us to section and widen the fenders, but the GT2 rules require production-type fenders with simple flares to accommodate wider tires. Consequently the race car looks like a production car, because it fundamentally is one."

ALUMINUM FRAME

The GT2 version of the Corvette C6.R is built on the same aluminum frame that underpins production Corvette Z06 and ZR1 models. In contrast, the GT1 race cars used steel frames from the Corvette coupe and convertible. Both aluminum and steel production Corvette frames are hydroformed, a process that uses high-pressure hydraulics to form complex shapes.

Fehan: "The race team had been exploring the aluminum frame for several years. The traditional methods of connecting a steel roll cage to an aluminum frame simply didn't provide a level of safety that met GM Racing's stringent standards. Consequently we have developed a proprietary installation method that is consistent with GM's commitment to safety."

Louth: "The race car chassis retains all of the elements in the production chassis structure - the windshield frame, the hoop around the rear of the passenger compartment, the door hinge pillars, the drivetrain tunnel, the firewall, the floor pan - they're all there. In the GT1 class, these components could be removed, modified, or trimmed down, but the ACO and FIA rules for GT2 require that we maintain all of the primary production chassis structure in the race car."

AERODYNAMICS

Differences in the GT1 and GT2 rules account for many of the changes in the Corvette C6.R's aerodynamic package. The front fender louvers used in GT1 are not allowed in GT2. The chord width of the rear wing was reduced 25 percent, from 400mm to 300mm. The diffuser now starts at the back of the rear wheel opening rather than at the centerline of the rear axle; strakes and sidewalls are not permitted, so the GT2 diffuser is a flat panel while the GT1 diffuser was effectively a tunnel. The production-based ZR1 splitter extends 25mm, in contrast to the 80mm splitter allowed under the GT1 rules.
Louth: "CFD (computational fluid dynamics) was the primary tool used to develop the aero package in the short time that was available. During the validation phase, the team performed high-speed straight-line tests and conducted a full-scale rolling-road wind tunnel test. We have been through all of our aerodynamic tuning options at the track, and the baseline aero settings meet all of the performance targets.

"As we developed the race car aero package, we went through a number of reviews with the Corvette design group. They were very interested not only in what we were doing, but what they might take away for future Corvettes. There was a two-way exchange of concepts and ideas, and it proved to be a very rewarding relationship."

Fehan: "The production splitter we are using in GT2 does not require a massive rear wing to produce aerodynamic balance, and consequently there is less total downforce. This actually makes the car more predictable over a wide range of speeds. The GT1 version had tremendous downforce, but the downforce was directly proportional to speed. In slow corners the car behaved differently than it did in fast corners, so the drivers had to adjust for the amount of grip they would have at various speeds. With the GT2 aero package, the car behaves very predictably in low, medium, and high-speed corners. Consequently the drivers report that the new Corvette C6.R a very good race car."

SUSPENSION AND STEERING

The GT1 Corvette C6.Rs were equipped with carbon brake rotors, while GT2 regulations require ferrous (steel) brake discs. The Corvette race car's wheel and tire dimensions are the same in both classes, but the GT2 version uses aluminum rather than magnesium rims.

Fehan: "The production ZR1 has ceramic brakes, which we would love to use in the race cars. However, the series requires steel brakes to help contain cost."

Louth: "Early in the GT1 program we ran steel brakes in the 24-hour Daytona race, so we did have some previous experience. We also received excellent information from our brake and pad suppliers, and input from GM's other racing programs. Initially there was some concern about the switch from carbon to steel brakes, but in the end the braking performance is actually very good. Steel brakes don't produce the absolute stopping power of carbon brakes, but the braking performance - repeatability, consistency and driver feel - hit our targets in fairly short order.

"The GT2 race car has a production steering column, with a fully adjustable steering wheel - a real convenience with as many as three drivers per car. The rack-and-pinion steering is also production."

SAFETY AND ERGONOMICS

Safety is the No. 1 priority at GM Racing. The GM Racing safety research and development program was founded in 1992, and it expanded from its initial focus on open-wheel cars to encompass stock car racing, sports car racing, drag racing and off-road racing. The racing safety program is built on the foundation of GM's world-class safety research and testing programs for passenger vehicles.

Louth: "Our chief concern was the aluminum chassis and the attachment of the steel safety cage. Analysis and physical testing of structural components suggest that this car is the safest GT car on the track. We carried over the energy-absorbing panels in the doors, the door bar structure, the crush structure, the right-side safety net, and other safety features from the GT1 Corvettes. These are not mandatory items, but we chose to add those components at a considerable cost and weight disadvantage because driver safety is our top priority.

"Driver ergonomics was not a big challenge because the cockpit layout and packaging is very similar to the GT1 C6.R. The production-based air conditioning system was carried over from the previous version because it had proven to be very effective, although improvements were made in the ducting."

TELEMETRY

The GT1 Corvettes were instrumented with nearly 100 sensors that monitored everything from engine oil temperature to tire pressures. Much of this information was transmitted in real time from the car to the pit, where engineers and technicians could watch for developing problems. The GT2 rules do not allow telemetry, so this data must now be downloaded during pit stops.

Louth: "Without telemetry, the driver has more responsibility to catch minor problems before they become major problems. Obviously a driver is extremely busy during a race, so he may be less effective at monitoring data and seeing warnings than someone in the pits who is focused on a computer screen. Since we cannot use telemetry in GT2, we are working on our dashboard alarms to alert the driver when there is a problem without distracting him when operating conditions are normal during a race.

"The ban on telemetry is due to cost considerations. However, the downside of not having telemetry is that when something does go wrong, it can result in a catastrophic failure that costs much more. A blown engine, a seized transmission, or a punctured tire that causes a crash and injures a driver are failures that can often be avoided or stopped short with telemetry."

CONSTRUCTION AND TESTING

The GT2-spec Corvettes were designed, built and tested on a compressed schedule. The program was approved and announced in September 2008, and construction of the first chassis began in early December. The first track test was conducted at Road Atlanta on April 8-9, followed by single-car tests in Elkhart Lake, Wis., and Sebring, Fla.

Fehan: "Testing has gone very well, and that's not really surprising with all of the lessons we learned in GT1. In the initial track test, we rolled the car out of the trailer and ran for two straight days with absolutely no problems. It was incredible, and everyone was understandably very excited.
"Corvette Racing has the advantage of sophisticated computer models for aero and chassis development, and we have a library of suspension setups. In the first two days of testing, we hit all of the predictions dead on, which validated both our software and our design.

"In the limited testing we've done so far, we've been very impressed with the car's durability, reliability and performance. We'll continue to focus on those three factors in the upcoming races. We view the rest of this year as a development cycle, and we believe that our experience as a team in preparation, race strategy, and pit stop execution should allow us to be competitive even if there is a slight performance disparity."

Gary Pratt, Corvette Racing team manager: "We're not running for a championship this year, so the testing we'd prefer to do in private we do in the public eye. We're looking at the next five races as preparation for 2010. Our goal is to learn as much as we can.

"In a perfect world we'd have the rest of this year to test and then come out with new cars at the start of next season, but we felt we just needed to get out there and race for the Corvette customers and fans. We think we'll be competitive, but there are many good cars and teams in GT2. We know it will be a challenge, and we're looking forward to it."

The GT2 version of the Corvette C6.R will make its debut at the Acura Sports Car Challenge at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio. The two-hour, 45-minute race is scheduled to start at 3 p.m. EDT on Saturday, August 8. ABC will televise the race tape-delayed at 2:30 p.m. EDT on Sunday, August 9.

General Motors Company, one of the world's largest automakers, traces its roots back to 1908. With its global headquarters in Detroit, GM employs 235,000 people in every major region of the world and does business in some 140 countries. GM and its strategic partners produce cars and trucks in 34 countries, and sell and service these vehicles through the following brands: Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, GM Daewoo, Holden, Opel, Vauxhall and Wuling. GM's largest national market is the United States, followed by China, Brazil, the United Kingdom, Canada, Russia and Germany. GM's OnStar subsidiary is the industry leader in vehicle safety, security and information services. General Motors Company acquired operations from General Motors Corporation on July 10, 2009, and references to prior periods in this and other press materials refer to operations of the old General Motors Corporation. More information on the new General Motors Company can be found at General Motors | Corporate Website | GM.
# # #
Contact:
Rick Voegelin
Chevy Racing Communications
Office: 831 761-2201
Mobile: 831 320-4860
rickvoegelin@compuserve.com
 
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Rob

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1990 Corvette ZR-1
2009 Corvette Engine Specifications

<table border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"> <tbody><tr> <td valign="top" width="197"> </td> <td valign="top" width="197">2009 Corvette ZR1
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">2009 GT2 Corvette C6.R
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Displacement (L / ci):
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">6.2 / 376
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">6.0 / 366
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Horsepower:
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">638 @ 6500 rpm
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">470 @ 4800 rpm
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Torque (lb-ft):
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">604 @ 3800 rpm
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">535 @ 4500 rpm
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Bore diameter (mm / in):
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">103.25 / 4.06
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">106.2 / 4.180
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Crankshaft stroke (mm / in):
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">92 / 3.62
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">84.33 / 3.32
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Deck height (mm / in):
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">235 / 9.24
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">235 / 9.24
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">"V" angle (deg):
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">90
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">90
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Cylinder bore spacing
(mm / ci):

</td> <td valign="top" width="197">111.7 / 4.40
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">111.7 / 4.40
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Valvetrain:
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">pushrod with overhead valves, titanium inlet
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">pushrod with overhead valves, titanium inlet and exhaust
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Valves per cylinder:
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">2
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">2
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Camshaft drive:
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">chain
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">chain
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Cylinder case material:
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">aluminum
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">aluminum
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Cylinder liners:
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">dry iron
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">none
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Cylinder head material:
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">aluminum
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">aluminum, CNC ported
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Lubrication system:
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">dry sump
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">dry sump
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Fuel system:
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">sequential EFI
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">sequential EFI
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Throttle system:
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">supercharged w/intercooler, throttle body
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">individual runner
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="197">Fuel:
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">premium unleaded gasoline required
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">E85R ethanol
</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
2009 Corvette Chassis Specifications
<table border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"> <tbody><tr> <td valign="top" width="203"> </td> <td valign="top" width="197">2009 Corvette ZR1
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">2009 GT2 Corvette C6.R
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="203">Body style:
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">two-door hatchback coupe
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">two-door hatchback coupe
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="203">Drivetrain:
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">longitudinal front engine, rear-wheel drive
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">longitudinal front engine, rear-wheel drive
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="203">Chassis:
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">hydroformed aluminum chassis, composite body
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">hydroformed aluminum chassis, composite body
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="203">Wheelbase (in):
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">105.7
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">105.7
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="203">Length (in):
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">176.2
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">176.2
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="203">Width (in):
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">75.9
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">78.6
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="203">Height (in):
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">49
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">45.9
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="203">Weight (lb):
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">3324
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">2745
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="203">Front suspension:
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">independent, short/long arm double wishbone, cast aluminum controls, transverse-mounted composite leaf spring, monotube shock absorbers, anti-roll bar
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">independent, short/long double wishbone, fabricated steel upper & lower, machined aluminum knuckle, coil-over multi-adjustable shock absorbers, anti-roll bar
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="203">Rear suspension:
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">independent, short/long arm double wishbone, cast aluminum control arms, transverse-mounted composite leaf spring, monotube shock absorbers; anti-roll bar
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">independent, short/long arm double wishbone, steel fabricated upper & lower control arms, machined aluminum knuckle, coil-over multi-adjustable shock absorbers, anti-roll bar
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="203">Brakes:
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">front and rear power-assisted carbon-ceramic disc with 6-piston front and 4-piston rear calipers, cross-drilled rotors, ABS
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">4-wheel disc with monoblock calipers, steel rotors and ceramic composite pads
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="203">Wheels (in):
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">19 x 10 (front); 20 x 12 (rear)
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">18 x 12.5 (front); 18 x 13 (rear)
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="203">Tires:
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Michelin Pilot Sport 2
P285/30ZR19 (front),
P335/25ZR20 (rear)

</td> <td valign="top" width="197">Michelin racing tires,
300/32-18 (front),
310/41-18 (rear)

</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="203">Fuel capacity (gal):
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">18
</td> <td valign="top" width="197">26.4
(29 @ ALMS E85R spec)

</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
# # #
Contact:
Rick Voegelin
Chevy Racing Communications
(831) 761-2201
rickvoegelin@compuserve.com
 
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Rob

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Corvette Racing Fast Facts

Corvette Racing is America's premier production sports car racing team. At the conclusion of the team's participation in the GT1 category in June 2009, Corvette Racing had won 77 races, eight consecutive American Le Mans Series GT1 manufacturers and team championships, and seven straight drivers championships. Corvette Racing has enjoyed international success in the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the world's biggest sports car race, with six class victories since 2001.
The team began its transition to a single GT class in 2010 with a move to the GT2 category at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course on August 8. Corvette Racing will test and develop the latest Corvette C6.R in the final five rounds of the 2009 American Le Mans Series.
Team: Corvette Racing
Owner: General Motors, Detroit, Mich.
Race Cars: Corvette C6.R (Corvette 6th generation, Racing)
Drivers:
·No. 3 Compuware Corvette C6.R: Johnny O'Connell, Jan Magnussen (plus Antonio Garcia for Sebring, Le Mans and Petit Le Mans)
·No. 4 Compuware Corvette C6.R: Oliver Gavin, Olivier Beretta (plus Marcel Fassler for Sebring, Le Mans and Petit Le Mans)
Team Personnel:
·Manager, GM Racing: Mark Kent
·Corvette Racing Program Manager: Doug Fehan
·Team Manager: Gary Pratt
·Engine Manager: Roger Allen
·Crew Chief, No. 3: Dan Binks
·Crew Chief, No. 4: Mike West
Primary Sponsor: Compuware
Associate Sponsors: XM Satellite Radio, UAW-GM, Genuine Corvette Accessories, Bose, Motorola, PRS Guitars, BBS, Michelin

<table border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"> <tbody><tr> <td colspan="5" valign="top" width="601">
Corvette Racing Record (through June 2009)
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="61">
Year
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
Races
</td> <td valign="top" width="60">
Wins
</td> <td valign="top" width="180">ALMS Driver Champions
</td> <td valign="top" width="234">ALMS Manufacturer/Team Champions
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="61">
1999
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
6
</td> <td valign="top" width="60">
0
</td> <td valign="top" width="180">
</td> <td valign="top" width="234">
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="61">
2000
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
8
</td> <td valign="top" width="60">
2
</td> <td valign="top" width="180">
</td> <td valign="top" width="234">
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="61">
2001
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
10
</td> <td valign="top" width="60">
8
</td> <td valign="top" width="180">
</td> <td valign="top" width="234">Chevrolet/Corvette Racing
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="61">
2002
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
11
</td> <td valign="top" width="60">
10
</td> <td valign="top" width="180">Fellows
</td> <td valign="top" width="234">Chevrolet/Corvette Racing
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="61">
2003
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
10
</td> <td valign="top" width="60">
5
</td> <td valign="top" width="180">Fellows/O'Connell
</td> <td valign="top" width="234">Chevrolet/Corvette Racing
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="61">
2004
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
10
</td> <td valign="top" width="60">
10
</td> <td valign="top" width="180">Fellows/O'Connell
</td> <td valign="top" width="234">Chevrolet/Corvette Racing
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="61">
2005
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
11
</td> <td valign="top" width="60">
10
</td> <td valign="top" width="180">Gavin/Beretta
</td> <td valign="top" width="234">Chevrolet/Corvette Racing
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="61">
2006
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
11
</td> <td valign="top" width="60">
6
</td> <td valign="top" width="180">Gavin/Beretta
</td> <td valign="top" width="234">Chevrolet/Corvette Racing
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="61">
2007
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
13
</td> <td valign="top" width="60">
12
</td> <td valign="top" width="180">Gavin/Beretta
</td> <td valign="top" width="234">Chevrolet/Corvette Racing
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="61">
2008
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
12
</td> <td valign="top" width="60">
11
</td> <td valign="top" width="180">O'Connell/Magnussen
</td> <td valign="top" width="234">Chevrolet/Corvette Racing
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="61">
2009
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
3
</td> <td valign="top" width="60">
3
</td> <td valign="top" width="180">
</td> <td valign="top" width="234">
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="61">
Total
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
105
</td> <td valign="top" width="60">
77
</td> <td valign="top" width="180">7 Consecutive
</td> <td valign="top" width="234">8 Consecutive
</td> </tr> </tbody></table> <table border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"> <tbody><tr> <td colspan="5" valign="top" width="590">
Corvette Racing 24 Hours of Le Mans Record
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
Year
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
Finish
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
Class
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Car
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Drivers
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
2000
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
3rd
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GTS
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C5-R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Pilgrim/Collins/Freon
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
4th
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GTS
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C5-R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Fellows/Kneifel/Bell
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
2001
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
1st
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GTS
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C5-R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Fellows/O'Connell/Pruett
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
2nd
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GTS
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C5-R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Pilgrim/Collins/Freon
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
2002
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
1st
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GTS
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C5-R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Fellows/O'Connell/Gavin
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
2nd
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GTS
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C5-R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Pilgrim/Collins/Freon
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
2003
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
2nd
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GTS
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C5-R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Gavin/Collins/Pilgrim
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
3rd
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GTS
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C5-R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Fellows/O'Connell/Freon
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
2004
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
1st
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GTS
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C5-R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Gavin/Beretta/Magnussen
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
2nd
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GTS
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C5-R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Fellows/O'Connell/ Papis
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
2005
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
1st
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GT1
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C6.R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Beretta/Gavin/Magnussen
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
2nd
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GT1
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C6.R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Fellows/O'Connell/Papis
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
2006
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
1st
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GT1
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C6.R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Beretta/Gavin/Magnussen
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
7th
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GT1
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C6.R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Fellows/O'Connell/Papis
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
2007
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
2nd
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GT1
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C6.R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Fellows/O'Connell/Magnussen
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
14th
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GT1
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C6.R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Beretta/Gavin/Papis
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
2008
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
2nd
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GT1
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C6.R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Fellows/O'Connell/Magnussen
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
3rd
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GT1
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C6.R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Beretta/Gavin/Papis
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
2009
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
1st
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GT1
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C6.R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">O'Connell/Magnussen/Garcia
</td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="67">
</td> <td valign="top" width="72">
4th
</td> <td valign="top" width="66">
GT1
</td> <td valign="top" width="156">Corvette C6.R
</td> <td valign="top" width="229">Gavin/Beretta/Fassler
</td> </tr> </tbody></table> Team Highlights
·Race wins: 77 (through June 2009)
·1-2 finishes: 54 (through June 2009)
·ALMS GT1 manufacturers championships: Eight (2001-08)
·ALMS GT1 team championships: Eight (2001-08)
·ALMS GT1 drivers championships: Seven (2002-08)
·24 Hours of Le Mans class wins: Six (2001-02, 2004-06, 2009)
·Sebring 12-hour class wins: Seven (2002-04, 2006-09)
·Petit Le Mans class wins: Seven (2000-02, 2004-05, 2007-08)
·American Le Mans Series records: Most race wins by entrant (70); most 1-2 finishes by entrant (51); longest winning streak in GT1 (25, 2007 Sebring/2009 Long Beach); most poles in GT1
·ALMS From the Fans awards: Gary Claudio, Corvette marketing manager, 2002; Doug Fehan, Corvette Racing program manager, 2004 and 2008
·ALMS Most Popular Driver awards: Ron Fellows, 2004-07
·Special awards: Overall winner in inaugural ALMS Green Challenge at 2008 Petit Le Mans; Corvette C6.R named "North American Car of the Year" by dailysportscar.com (February 2006); Corvette LS7.R engine named "Global Motorsport Engine of the Year" at the Professional Motorsport World Expo (November 2006); Corvette Racing awarded Michelin Energy Endurance Challenge trophy for most efficient use of fuel in GT1 class at 24 Hours of Le Mans (June 2007).
Corvette Racing Firsts
·First race: Daytona 24-hour, Feb. 5, 1999
·First GTS win: Texas Motor Speedway, Sept. 2, 2000, drivers Ron Fellows and Andy Pilgrim
·First overall win: Daytona 24-hour, Feb. 3, 2001;
Ron Fellows/Chris Kneifel/Franck Freon/Johnny O'Connell

·First 1-2 finish: Daytona 24-hour, Feb. 3, 2001
(1st: Fellows/Kneifel/Freon/O'Connell; 2nd: Andy Pilgrim/Dale Earnhardt/Dale Earnhardt Jr./Kelly Collins)
·First Le Mans class win: 2001 (Fellows/O'Connell/Scott Pruett)
·First ALMS drivers championship: Ron Fellows, 2002
·First ALMS manufacturers championship: 2001
·First undefeated season: 2004 (nine ALMS races and 24 Hours of Le Mans)
Corvette Racing Notes
·The C6.R is the most technically advanced sports car ever developed by GM, combining sophisticated chassis, powertrain and aerodynamic technology developed by GM Racing with the advanced engineering of the sixth-generation Corvette and Corvette Z06 and ZR1 production models.
·Corvette Racing is powered by E85R ethanol racing fuel, a high-octane, renewable alternative fuel, in the 2009 American Le Mans Series. As part of the series' "green racing" initiative, the most successful team in ALMS history is using a blend of ethanol and racing gasoline to demonstrate the benefits of a fuel that helps to reduce dependence on petroleum, helps to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, and helps to create greater diversity in energy supplies.
·2009 marks Corvette's 53rd year in international road racing. John Fitch and Walt Hansgen drove a Corvette to a ninth-place finish overall and a Class B victory at the 12 Hours of Sebring in 1956, the first step onto the world stage that established Chevy's sports car as a contender in top-level competition.
·The rulebook requires close adherence to production specifications, and the Corvette C6.R's roots reach to the Corvette assembly plant in Bowling Green, Ky. The same hydroformed frame rails used in production Corvettes provide the foundation for the racing version.
·Corvette Racing's C6.R race cars are powered by race-prepared GM small-block V-8 engines. Technology developed in racing inspired the production 7.0-liter/505-hp LS7 small-block V-8 that powers the production Corvette Z06.
·The GM small-block V-8 is America's most popular and most successful production-based racing engine. Total production of GM small-block-based engines is approaching 90 million units. This engine has powered more winning race cars and won more championships than any other engine in American motorsports.
# # #
Contact:
Rick Voegelin
Chevy Racing Communications
(831) 761-2201
rickvoegelin@compuserve.com
 
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Rob

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  • Thread starter
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Rob

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KANE

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Thanks Rob!

:thumb

The stats, pics & articles were great!

Kinda makes me want to go out and buy a salvaged C5/C6 and build it up like ARKvette02's ride. :Steer
 

Evolution1980

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ZZ4, 700R4, Steeroids rack & pinion, VB&P Brakes
Damn I wish I had seen this sooner. I had the potential to go to this. My female friend went her brother. She sent me some pics but neither of us realized what she was probably seeing. Damn. Ah well... Maybe her brother took some pics I can snag.
 

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