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Grand Sport Catch Can Installed

For discussions related to a Grand Sport Corvette.
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Eric ray

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Installed an Elite Engineering Catch Can on my 2013 G/S. Will see how effective these things are.

photo 2 (18).jpg
 

LLC5

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E

Eric ray

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What problem are you trying to fix with it?
More like preventative maintenance option for your PVC system. Helps keep unwanted oil and other vapors force back through your intake, which should help keep valves clean.
 

Hib Halverson

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If you'r worried about keeping the backside of the intake valves clean, use a detergent based injector cleaner like Chevron Techron on a regular basis, say once every 4 or 5 fill ups.

Unless your a serious trackday persion, my guess is you won't find a lot of oil in that catchcan system.

About the only sitaution where a catchcan is useful is in cases of racing duty cycles where you get a lot of flow reversal though the PVC, ie: you get oil vapor coming out the clean side into the TB.
 
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08 VR Convertible 2014 TR Coupe
I installed the Elite catch can in my 2014 non Z51 coupe. After 3000+ miles, I had collected almost 2 ounces of oil. Of course with a direct injection system, I wanted to catch as much oil from entering the system as possible. Not all catch cans are the same and I found the Elite to be very efficient as there was no oil in the outlet line from the can. The Z51 package requires another hose installation on the wet side. Chevrolet is on record I believe that catch cans are not necessary on direct injection engines, but the installation does not void the warranty. To solve the wet (dirty) side of the system on the Z51, Chevrolet recommends that the oil level on the dip stick be at the 1/2 full mark or less, oitherwise the air filter box gets coated with oil. Many European manufacturers install catch cans on their direct injection engines. I have not put a catch can on my 2008 connvertible.

Barrett
 

Hib Halverson

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71 04 12 19
The OP was about catch cans on port injected engines. I think they are a waste of money and effor unless the application is a track or race car.

Oil ingestion and catch cans on DGI engines is a different issue. All manufacturings with DGI engines are having to deal with what to do about intake valves which get oiled through the normal function of the PCV system and then the oil cokes.

My understanding is that right now, if it's forced to address an DGI engine with coked-up intake valves, GM replaces the heads.
 

JOV

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Vacaville, ca, usa
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2019 ZR1 Blade Silver Metalic
The OP was about catch cans on port injected engines. I think they are a waste of money and effor unless the application is a track or race car.

Oil ingestion and catch cans on DGI engines is a different issue. All manufacturings with DGI engines are having to deal with what to do about intake valves which get oiled through the normal function of the PCV system and then the oil cokes.

My understanding is that right now, if it's forced to address an DGI engine with coked-up intake valves, GM replaces the heads.


Then would it be wise for owners of new C7's with LT1 and LT4 motors to install catch cans and check them for oil at every oil change ?? I find it hard to believe that GM has not included a service / maintenance procedure say at every 30K miles to address this issue.

Also does GM sell a catch can thru their parts/ accessory dept , that won't void the warranty ??

Thanks in advance ! :beer
 

kpic

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What problem are you trying to fix with it?

I honestly don't know if it is a problem for N/A or boosted engines; however, I'd prefer sending the oil vapors into a can rather than into the intake manifold. Not all the oil vapor makes it to the combustion chamber; some stays as deposits in the intake manifold.

As I am boosted; I plan on venting the driver's side valve cover to the can also. Pressurizing the crankcase creates a resistance as the pistons come down. Under boost or high RPM operation the PVC's job is to prevent pressurizing the crankcase.

Some interesting reading on the subject,

Oil Catch Cans | Everything you need to know and more!

The PCV valve serves two purposes in the stock setup. When in vacuum (as in the above diagrams), the PCV valves job is to limit the flow into the intake manifold (think of it as a coffee straw). If it were not there, the intake manifold would essentially have a huge vacuum leak, and idle would be erradic. On top of that, the amount of vacuum seen by the crank case would likely be way too high... hurting oil control and potentially causing damage to the motor.
In boost, the PCV's job is to prevent boost pressure from entering the crank case. It behaves much like a check valve in this function, not allowing flow in the opposite direction. Herein lies one of the primary deficiencies of the stock system (especially at higher power levels): when in boost, not only does the crank case no longer have a source of vacuum to help purge the pressure... but it's also limited to a single port to vent out of. And unfortunately... that port is all the way on the opposite side of the motor from where the pressure is generated. As the pressure flow travels from the crank case, up through the timing cover, and out through the gamut of valve cover baffles... it picks up lots of oily vapors. The valve cover baffle network does a decent job at relatively low power levels, but as the blow by increases, they can become restrictive, and don't do as good a job in containing the oil. This means residual oil vapor ends up going into the turbo inlet pipe, and eventually into the motor. These oil vapors aren't just "nasty" cause they're dirty looking, but oil vapors can also significantly reduce the effective octane of the fuel, increasing the potential for detonation. Here's a diagram of the stock pcv flow under boost:
PCV Plate & Vented OCC Notes


I go back to the per-emmision days, when we would add vents to the valve covers. After a Sunday afternoon at the drag strip the valve cover breathers would leave a light coating of oil on the valve covers.





 

LLC5

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I go back to the per-emmision days, when we would add vents to the valve covers. After a Sunday afternoon at the drag strip the valve cover breathers would leave a light coating of oil on the valve covers.








I'm old enough to remember as a kid crossing a street and having to walk over tar strips in the middle of the road from engines venting down below the transmission bell housing and onto the streets. Ouch! Long time ago....:)
 

kpic

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Columbus, NC/NE Georgia
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I'm old enough to remember as a kid crossing a street and having to walk over tar strips in the middle of the road from engines venting down below the transmission bell housing and onto the streets. Ouch! Long time ago....:)

Yes it was and it was a good time to be alive with a driver's license, The air was filled with a smell from what the EPA would call unburnt hydrocarbons from something called cam overlap while radio antennas shook with power, not a miss. LOL
Once, I helped stuff a 3x2 348 into a a late 1940s Chevy convertible. When it was floored, the overbore (long time since I used that word) breather would send smoke through the floorboards.

In the beginning, "hot rods" were limited to those who could turn a wrench and swap an engine. In the mid-1960s, anyone with credit could own a fast car. However, it took no time at all for the guys who could turn a wrench to realize the muscle car was a way to start with more power in the basket. Today adds MPG to the power which is very cool.
;)
 

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