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Cutting Cross member Reccomendations

BLACK MOON

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Oct 21, 2003
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654
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KNOXVILLE, TN
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15 Shark Grey 3LZ Z06
I have to remove my new Keisler 5 speed (300 miles) and rather than removing the motor I was considering cutting the transmission cross member and removing it from the bottom. Since the Keisler is several inches longer than the Muncie it can not be dropped with the cross member in place. Can anyone suggest where to cut it and how to set it up to be bolted back in. I'm hoping that someone has already dealt with this and can guide me.
Thanks
Sal
 

Rowdy1

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Mar 26, 2001
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1,180
Location
Lake Hopatcong, NJ
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1962 CORVETTE-SOLD 2004 Z16 Z06 CE
Sorry To Hear That

I can't help you seeing as how your frame and my 62 are do different but I have to ask why it has to come out with only 300 miles on it. Good luck and keep us posted on how you make out.
 

Wilkinshc

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Dec 4, 2004
Messages
242
Location
New Mexico
Corvette
1965 Coupe
I have to remove my new Keisler 5 speed (300 miles) and rather than removing the motor I was considering cutting the transmission cross member and removing it from the bottom. Since the Keisler is several inches longer than the Muncie it can not be dropped with the cross member in place. Can anyone suggest where to cut it and how to set it up to be bolted back in. I'm hoping that someone has already dealt with this and can guide me.
Thanks
Sal

This link should help.

http://www.onr.com/user/richb/rich66/crossmember/index.htm

Chuck
 

John Mcgraw

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Feb 18, 2003
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816
Location
Austin Tx
Corvette
1960 Roman red, 1959 resto-rod, 1965 resto-rod
Black Moon,

This is not a stock frame, it is a custom frame, but this should give you an idea how to do it.

http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2003-8/339303/HGHTJ-frame02.jpg

It is just cut outboard of the exhaust holes. You weld a pair of plates to each side of the cut out piece, so you can bolt it back to the crossmember. When you make the cut, make sure that the cut is slightly tapered to the center at the top of the crossmember. This will make the removable piece slightly wedge shaped, and will assure that it can be removed from the bottom. I saw one once, where the cut was angled to the outside slightly, and the removable piece could only be removed from the top. It kind of defeated the whole idea of having a removable crossmember!

Regards, John McGraw
 

BLACK MOON

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Oct 21, 2003
Messages
654
Location
KNOXVILLE, TN
Corvette
15 Shark Grey 3LZ Z06
Thanks everyone. The reason for the removal is a (brand new) noisey throwout bearing. Also, the transmission shifts hard and grinds going into second under mild acceleration. Keisler is willing to go thru it but i need to pull it. I may go thru the top but am looking at easier solutions. I have a bolt in crossmember from an automatic and may look at that option as well.
Thanks again.
 

Wilkinshc

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Dec 4, 2004
Messages
242
Location
New Mexico
Corvette
1965 Coupe
Black Moon,

I used a bowtie overdrive crossmember to bolt up my 200r4. If you look at my homepage under my name, you will see a couple of pics.

Chuck
 

BLACK MOON

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Oct 21, 2003
Messages
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Location
KNOXVILLE, TN
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15 Shark Grey 3LZ Z06
Chuck,
Where did you buy that cross member and what did it cost you? I assume that it bolts in place. Let me know.
Thanks
 
Joined
Nov 11, 2001
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5,980
Location
SouthCentral Ontario
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www.67HEAVEN.com
I'd be interested in hearing some thoughts on the step-by-step of the cutting procedure, and the importance of stabilizing the frame as the cuts are made.

Assuming that the car is supported on a lift at the jacking points, what are the possibilities of movement following the cuts, and therefore what difficulty might there be in achieving re-alignment when bolting the crossmember back in?
 

Wilkinshc

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Joined
Dec 4, 2004
Messages
242
Location
New Mexico
Corvette
1965 Coupe
I'd be interested in hearing some thoughts on the step-by-step of the cutting procedure, and the importance of stabilizing the frame as the cuts are made.

Assuming that the car is supported on a lift at the jacking points, what are the possibilities of movement following the cuts, and therefore what difficulty might there be in achieving re-alignment when bolting the crossmember back in?

Bob,

Not sure if that was directed at me but I will answer.

Actually no support was needed. Remember the c-3 automatic (basically the same frame) has a bolt in crossmember. Once I cut out the crossmember, I was suprised at how thin the metal was on the stock crossmember. The overdrive crossmember wieghed about twice as much.

Chuck
 

Tyler Townsley

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Jul 29, 2001
Messages
286
Location
Nichols. Florida
Corvette
55 , 66 coupe, 68 convert, 88 ZR1, 90 ZR1
I have done it with a 68, cut it about 4 in from each side. Used a bolt in plate inside the xmember when it went back in. I taped the plate, since I put in a 6 speed I also had to make a spacer for the different in the mounting points of the 2 transmissions.

Tyler
 

richscorvettes

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Joined
Mar 6, 2002
Messages
400
Location
Connecticut
Corvette
1963 & 2007 Z06 Coupes
I'd be interested in hearing some thoughts on the step-by-step of the cutting procedure, and the importance of stabilizing the frame as the cuts are made.

Assuming that the car is supported on a lift at the jacking points, what are the possibilities of movement following the cuts, and therefore what difficulty might there be in achieving re-alignment when bolting the crossmember back in?

Sal, I was going to respond to the post earlier, however, it appears that your car has under car exhaust and the approach we took eliminated the cross-member pass-throughs since we had side exhaust. If you think it would be of any help though you can send me an e-mail and I can send two pictures of how we did it.

Bob, You are right about having to stabilize the frame rails before cutting. We cut the cross-member while the body was on the frame and placed two spreader bars between the rails before cutting to keep everything in alignment. We also had one to support the engine and keep that in alignment to weld in the transmission mount.

We used a Saws-All to make the cuts in the cross-member about 12" from the frame rails (with some shielding to protect the under body area) and welded in mounting plates to each end of the cut cross-member. Then a new removeable cross-member was made from 2" x 4" tubing with plates welded to each end to provide the mount to the modified cross-member. Sure came in handy when we had to remove the transmission to work on the hydraulic clutch!

Rich Lagasse
 

Wilkinshc

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Dec 4, 2004
Messages
242
Location
New Mexico
Corvette
1965 Coupe
Bob, You are right about having to stabilize the frame rails before cutting. We cut the cross-member while the body was on the frame and placed two spreader bars between the rails before cutting to keep everything in alignment. We also had one to support the engine and keep that in alignment to weld in the transmission mount.
Rich Lagasse

I'm sure it does not hurt to add the spreader bars but I doubt it is needed. You have the crossmember in the front and rear. Not to mention the frame rails and crossmember are boxed. If make your marks on the crossmember, taking in consideration the thickness of the plates and the angles so it will slide in from the bottom you should not have any problems. Unless your going to have road racing forces on the frame. If you think about it, if the c-3 have a bolt in tranny cross member and driving forces don't twist the frame, how much support do need with it just sitting there will you cut and put your plates in.

Chuck
 

richscorvettes

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Mar 6, 2002
Messages
400
Location
Connecticut
Corvette
1963 & 2007 Z06 Coupes
I'm sure it does not hurt to add the spreader bars but I doubt it is needed. You have the crossmember in the front and rear. Not to mention the frame rails and crossmember are boxed. If make your marks on the crossmember, taking in consideration the thickness of the plates and the angles so it will slide in from the bottom you should not have any problems. Unless your going to have road racing forces on the frame. If you think about it, if the c-3 have a bolt in tranny cross member and driving forces don't twist the frame, how much support do need with it just sitting there will you cut and put your plates in.

Chuck

Actually a friend of mine suggested supporting the frame rails before we cut the cross-member and I was glad he did as we did have some movement once it was cut. It wasn't much but enough to make a difference in the width. At the very least I would suggest measuring the width between the frame rails before cutting to see if there is any change once it's cut. If there is you could then make whatever adjustement is necessary.

Rich Lagasse
 

BLACK MOON

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Joined
Oct 21, 2003
Messages
654
Location
KNOXVILLE, TN
Corvette
15 Shark Grey 3LZ Z06
I'd be interested in hearing some thoughts on the step-by-step of the cutting procedure, and the importance of stabilizing the frame as the cuts are made.

Assuming that the car is supported on a lift at the jacking points, what are the possibilities of movement following the cuts, and therefore what difficulty might there be in achieving re-alignment when bolting the crossmember back in?

Man I hope that isn't the case. I would think the frame is stiff enough that the crossmember doesn't maintain the geometry. We'll see. I'll keep you posted.

I'm sorry I haven't kept up with this thread and all of your responses. I usually get emails telling me when there is a reply but not in this case.

I also have a bolt in crossmember from an automatic. The problem is that my frame is powdercoated and I'm worried that I would screw it up.
 
Joined
Jan 1, 2002
Messages
7,246
Location
Washington, Michigan
Corvette
'67 Marina Blue Convertible
Here's another alternative, from Street Shops - they had a display at the NCRS meet in Orlando, and I took these photos there yesterday; this is their custom frame, but it shows how they attach their bolt-in crossmember to the side rails. :)
 

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