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buffer motors.....where to get one at a good price?

firstgear

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Joined
Oct 11, 2003
Messages
1,895
Location
Norwalk, Ohio
Corvette
15 Z06, 01 Vert, 63 SWC & 60 ALL RED
I would like to be able to do some polishing of SS and aluminum. What is the best source for a buffer motor? What HP should I be going with? other comments and suggestions?

thanks, Herb
 

WayneC

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Joined
Jan 5, 2002
Messages
472
Location
Santa Barbara CA
Corvette
63 roadster project
You didn't mention if you're going for price or quality. If it's price and you don't plan to do a lot of it,
maybe this would do the trick for you:

http://tinyurl.com/2btsmo

Or here are more choices in a higher price range:

http://tinyurl.com/ysuckp

I've not done much metal buffing, but my understanding is that you need to buy a selection of the right buffs and compound (and never mix them); and you try to pretty
much let the buffer do the work, rather than pressing on the piece, so you don't require a lot of horsepower.
 

WayneC

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Jan 5, 2002
Messages
472
Location
Santa Barbara CA
Corvette
63 roadster project
Here's some advice on motor hp....
http://tinyurl.com/2haeva

Basically, the larger and wider the buffs you use, the more power you need and the costlier the motor; smaller buffs and/or less width don't need as much power and the motor costs less, but they don't get the job done as fast. Depending on the shapes of the objects you're polishing, you may need to use smaller narrower buffs to get into nooks & crannies. Hard metals polish faster with higher rpm, while soft plastics may heat/burn if you use high rpm and large buffs. So, you make tradeoffs.
 

richscorvettes

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 6, 2002
Messages
400
Location
Connecticut
Corvette
1963 & 2007 Z06 Coupes
Herb, Here are the three places I usually go to for buffers and supplies:

http://www.eastwoodco.com/ http://www.tptools.com/ http://www.jlindustrial.com/

The information that Wayne has posted has also been my experience regarding size, speed and power. I have a Baldor 1.5 HP unit with 10" pads that works well for larger pieces. The longer shafts helps with having enough room to get into tight places. I also have a 1/2 HP unit with 8" pads which works well for smaller pieces.

One thing you might want to consider looking into is a two speed unit (1,800/3,600 rpm). Eastwoods has a 1 HP two-speed model and TP Tools has a Baldor two-speed unit. The higher rpm is used for harder materials and will produce the best results but sometimes you can work at slower speeds on other materials.

I usually get the buffer pads from Eastwoods as well as the compounds. They have two different width pads and I like the wider pads for larger pieces.

Here is an article that should help with other information you will need:

http://www.corvettefever.com/techarticles/corp_0506_stainless_steel_corvette_trim_restoration/

Another piece of equipment that can often help is a flex cable which mounts into a power source such as a drill press and uses small buffers (Eastwood has all sorts of shapes) which can help get into tight spots.

There are a number of things to take into account for your safety as well as avoiding damage to your parts. It's best to practice with an old piece to develop the approach you feel most comfortable with and one that produces the results you want. Watch for catching an edge as that can scare the heck out of you!

Hope that helps.

Rich Lagasse
 

John Mcgraw

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Joined
Feb 18, 2003
Messages
816
Location
Austin Tx
Corvette
1960 Roman red, 1959 resto-rod, 1965 resto-rod
I agree with Rich on the Baldor buffer. It is the best buffer that you can buy off the shelf! Being anal retentive, I finally broke down and built my own buffing stand a few years ago, and I am glad that I did. I put a 1.5hp motor on it and it drives the shaft through a belt system that allows me to change speeds quickly. I made it with 28" of overhang on each side of the stand, so I can get parts all around the buffing wheels. If you don't want to go to all that trouble, you will find the Baldor buffer will last a lifetime, and will serve you well!


Regards, John McGraw
 

IH2LOSE

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Joined
May 24, 2001
Messages
3,908
Location
We Will All Meet Again
Corvette
1966,and a 1962 thats almost complete
Sorry for being so late on this Herb but I have been traveling for work quite a bit .

I purchased a baldor buffer for my project from the suggestion from John , I will have to look at who I got it from but I think it was from TP tools on the recomendation of Rich.

Mine is a 1 hp (Ithink) 2 speed unit that I only stalled twice.I dont remember what I paid for it but at the time I had fealt I had gotton a great price on the set up.

Have fun

the biggest problem with buffing (beside the mess) is that its very addicting as you never think your done as you always think just a little more time on the wheel will put more of a shine on it.

John McGraw had given me a ton of information on how to buff, I dont remember if it was with a phone call or in an email or in a post here . There is actually an art to it , I will check the archive or my 62's file to see if it was written instructions or was verbal

Good Luck and have fun

but be carefull I had many a part torn out of my hand and thrown across the garage because I was working the part on the wrong part of the wheel. I dont know how to describe it but you will soon find out what the wrong part of the wheel is. The closer you get to it the more pull you feel on the part ....till ..... you get to the wrong part of the wheel and then your stairing at your empty hands trying to figure out where the part went, then in a nano secound you here it crashing into something across the garage

I KID YOU NOT
 

BLACK MOON

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Joined
Oct 21, 2003
Messages
654
Location
KNOXVILLE, TN
Corvette
15 Shark Grey 3LZ Z06
You didn't mention if you're going for price or quality. If it's price and you don't plan to do a lot of it,
maybe this would do the trick for you:

http://tinyurl.com/2btsmo

Or here are more choices in a higher price range:

http://tinyurl.com/ysuckp

I've not done much metal buffing, but my understanding is that you need to buy a selection of the right buffs and compound (and never mix them); and you try to pretty
much let the buffer do the work, rather than pressing on the piece, so you don't require a lot of horsepower.


Herb,
I have this one from Harbor freight and it's worked very well. I do wish it was stronger but being weaker has probably saved some fingers from being torn off. They run it on sale for $39 every once in a while. My suggestions after rebuilding my 63 and doing alot of polishing: Buy one with longer shafts and more HP. I wish I could upgrade my shaft size and strength. I can't wait to hear the responses from that.
Best,
Sal
 

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