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knowing HOW

grumpyvette

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 17, 2001
Messages
841
Location
Loxahatchee, FL, Palm Beach co
KNOWING WHAT YOUR DOING IS IMPORTANT, TO GETTING GOOD RESULTS!
no one knows everything about all models and years so it helps to have the correct procedures and info in a handy referace source,now you can get by with a HAYNES or CHILTONS manual, or something similar, but for detailed info, OWNING the CHEVY SHOP MANUAL FOR YOUR SPECIFIC CAR IS ALMOST MANDATORY!
I get asked frequently, "how did you know how to do that?"
well, EXPERIANCE plays a big roll, working on similar cars and engines helps, and the INTERNET is a good resource... but theres ALWAYS a big need for DETAILED REFERANCE MATERIAL, SPECIFICALLY MATCHING YOUR PARTICULAR CAR and if you have not yet invested in a SHOP MANUAL for the year make and model of you pride and joy muscle car your either not serious about your hobby, or most likely NOT A SERIOUS HOT RODDER! I constantly see guys SCREWING up installations, or adjustments,if you don,t know exactly what your doing, you need to either let the dealer do it and PRAY his mechanics are experianced and can read, OR..if your like ME, you would rather do it yourself and KNOW its been done correctly...
if your not aware, heres where to order them....
1-800-782-4356
http://helminc.com/helm/homepage.asp?r=
your average shop manual may cost $100-$150 ONCE! but youll easily save far more than that in reduced time and screw ups in under a years time or in many cases on one job vs having the dealer do the work!
 

68Roadster

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 16, 2002
Messages
1,040
Location
Dallas, TX
Corvette
'68 White Vert '05 Silverado SS
I hear ya grumpy and couldn't agree more!
I've bought Helm manuals for every Corvette I have owned. Just got the 2006 set last week.
They may be a bit pricey but you can't beat 'em. I personally don't like working from a book that covers '68 to '82, leaves too much out.
 
Joined
Jan 1, 2002
Messages
7,246
Location
Washington, Michigan
Corvette
'67 Marina Blue Convertible
Absolutely right! You'd be amazed how many C1-C2-C3 owners not only don't have the GM Shop Manuals, they don't even have an owner's manual! Not many places left that have any technical references for these older cars, and most technicians that understood engines with carburetors and distributors and how to tune them have retired. You'd better have a Shop Manual, because no place you take it to get it worked on (if you can't do it yourself) is going to have one, and they'll be guessing with anything they do. The GM Shop Manuals for the older cars are only about thirty bucks - best bargain out there! :)
 

Ripp 73

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 13, 2004
Messages
407
Location
Columbus, OH
Corvette
1973 L82 Blue Coupe
Just like the others, I couldn't agree more. As soon as I picked up my 76 Corvette I picked up the Haynes manual on my way home. Then about a week later I ordered the full Shop Manual for it. I could not believe the detail that is in the shop manual. The Haynes books are good for walking you through steps, but sometimes there is something that they miss. Espically when they are trying to cover a certain era of Corvettes (like 68 - 82). Even though I sold my 76 Stingray, I kept the shop manual. I plan on getting another Corvette in about two or so years, and who knows, it might just be a 76, although I'm really going to be looking for either a 68 or a 73.
 

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