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Oil Additive's-which One's Best???

Ken

Gone but not forgotten
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Jan 30, 2001
Messages
8,236
Location
Hermosa Beach, CA
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1987 Z51 Silver Coupe
:L I stated earlier in this thread something about "Just say no..." and today I purchased some of the Lucas Oil Products "Stops Slip" for automatic transmissions. I'm going to use it in the truck as an added safeguard for when I tow the Corvette and trailer.

It's supposed to "clean and lubricate sticking valves for proper shifting, extend fluid life up to three times longer and control heat and foaming. It is recommended for RVs, tow vehicles, and all other hard-working transmissions. It is also compatible with all transmission fluids."

I can't see that it would hurt. ;)

_ken :w
 

Rob

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1990 Corvette ZR-1
Ken said:
Addititives - Just Say No! :nono

_ken :L

I agree. Follow the manufacturer's recommended fill as per your owner's manual/service manual.
 

Rob

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1990 Corvette ZR-1
Ken said:
:L I stated earlier in this thread something about "Just say no..." and today I purchased some of the Lucas Oil Products "Stops Slip" for automatic transmissions. I'm going to use it in the truck as an added safeguard for when I tow the Corvette and trailer.

It's supposed to "clean and lubricate sticking valves for proper shifting, extend fluid life up to three times longer and control heat and foaming. It is recommended for RVs, tow vehicles, and all other hard-working transmissions. It is also compatible with all transmission fluids."

I can't see that it would hurt. ;)

_ken :w

Oh surrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrreeeeeeeeeeee Ken....after I find your initial post and think....."Ken...right on dude....." and quote you in my reply. :SLAP :SLAP I'm taking a star off your plaque on the refridgerator. LOL :L
 

Ken

Gone but not forgotten
Joined
Jan 30, 2001
Messages
8,236
Location
Hermosa Beach, CA
Corvette
1987 Z51 Silver Coupe
:L Remember, this truck has quite a few miles on it; I just trying to make sure I have no trouble with it next week. ;)

I wouldn't use anything in the new Vette engine. Castrol Syntec there. :D

_ken :w
 
D

Deusxmachine

Guest
When I bought my vette it had 50,000 miles on it. It was drove bya women, who took it to a quick change oil center. She did have the reciets showing it had been every 3000 miles. The change oil light came on the first day I drove it and I put quaker state syn blend in it. After I found this site i decided to put Mobil 1 syn in since it got such rave reviews. So far i have seen no leaks and the oil always stays far cooler than the water temp. Is there any problems to look out for if you change to syn after so many miles. Plus whats the deal with blended oils, if syn and nautral oils dont bond. One more thing what about gas additives like cleaners and octane boosters.
 

Ken

Gone but not forgotten
Joined
Jan 30, 2001
Messages
8,236
Location
Hermosa Beach, CA
Corvette
1987 Z51 Silver Coupe
Derek, first off, there usually is no problem encountered when mixing synthetic and petroleum-based (more commonly know as conventional) oils.

Conventional mineral motor oils are refined using crude oil for the base stock which contain impurities, such as nitrogen, wax, carbon, sulfur and aromatic residues. Refining removes most impurities but some remain to cause problems, especially under high stress and temperatures.

Synthetic oils are developed in the laboratory from man-made organic esters and other synthesized hydrocarbons. These oils contain no impurities, but impurities can appear during combustion.

Even the best mineral-based motor oils break down or oxidize at temperatures of 121°C to 149°C (250° to 300°F). At temperatures above this the life of these oils drops drastically, resulting in increased engine wear and formation of harmful sludge, varnish and other deposits. Synthetic oils can easily tolerate temperatures of up to 232°C (450°F), and some can go up to 371°C (700°F). Synthetic oils also resist oxidation up to 10 times longer.

Synthetic oils work better at low temperatures because they flow much more freely, down to -40°C to -46°C (-40° to -43°F). Synthetic oils also start lubricating sooner and reach the valve train faster.

Because synthetic oils are slipperier, friction is reduced, but fuel economy is improved only a little; the real economic payoff comes from fewer repairs.

Long intervals between oil changes are possible because synthetics resist oxidation, suffer less viscosity breakdown and decompose less into sludge. But don't overdo it. Filters should be changed at the normal recommended intervals.

Be careful about using synthetics in an engine with high mileage: the new oil could include a different detergent that can break loose accumulated deposits, clog oil passages and cause other havoc inside the engine.

Secondly, be careful about having too low of an oil temperature. You need to get the oil warm enough to vaporize any contaminents that find their way into the oiling system. You should expect to keep the oil temperature around 93°C (200°F) in order to be effective. The oil temperature won't even give you a read-out until you hit approximately 65°C (150°F), and you don't out of range until you go above 149°C (300°F).

Finally, as for gasoline additives, it doesn't hurt to run a bottle of injector cleaner through a tank of gas every so often, but if you are always using a quality gasoline from a reputable dealer, there usually is no need for additional additives. The additives vary from each oil company, but the gasoline often is the same no matter what label you may see on the pump. This happens because of what is known as "common carrier" pipelines; a barrel of gasoline that goes nto that pipeline in Texas is not going to be the same barrel that comes out of the pipeline somewhere on the east coast. ;)

I hope I didn't muddy the waters any more than necessary. Actually, I hope it helped you. :D

_ken :w
 
P

primeratec5

Guest
Hey everybody,

This is/has been very informative. Anyone aware of any problems when you change to synthetic oil on a 16 year old engine that has only 25,000 miles but had oil changed at least annually. Thanks in advance for replies.
 

vigman

Motor head!!!!
Joined
Feb 13, 2001
Messages
3,471
Location
Valencia, CA,USA
Corvette
88 Convert ( SOLD ) /1973 coupe 4 speed/1964 Vert!
My.02

Castrol 20 50 GTX
Always ran it....never and I mean NEVER had an engine failure of any kind.

I learned my lesson with Arco Graphite......


Straight texas crude squeezin's for me!

Vig!
 
L

LarryBible

Guest
IMHO one of the many reasons engines today last so much longer than in the past is the level that our oil additive packages have reached. I'm speaking of the oil additive package that is put in the oil by the manufacturers.

Most all of them have put many years and many dollars into developing the BALANCE of these blends. When you add something to the oil, you are upsetting the balance that they have worked so hard to achieve.

If you want to do something extra, I suggest that one takes the money they would have spent in these miracle additives and use it to change oil and filter more often.

Most folks will consider me to be a total nut for what I am about to describe, but that's okay:

I change oil and filter in my cars at around 3,333 miles. It's easy to keep up with this way. My Vette sometimes gets more time on the oil than miles, so it gets changed every 2,500. My oil change procedure is where I probably differ from many of you.

I drain the oil after a THOROUGH warm up, which is at least about 17 miles of driving. I also try, and almost always succeed, to drain it on a Friday night or some time when I can let it drain at least overnight. By doing this, the crankcase contaminants are suspended (churned up) in the oil. The oil is thin, so it drains out taking the contaminants with it. If you drain while the engine is cold, many of the contaminants will cling to the inside of the engine, rather than drain out.

By draining overnight, every last drop that I can get out, comes out. The last few drops are more sludge filled than the first few.

I've followed this procedure for about 35 years, and every engine that I've taken apart, which has been several, has been spotless inside, no build up or sludge anywhere.

So, you can now label me as the oil change fanatic if you wish, but with this procedure I have never found the need for additives other than the package that comes with our oils at no extra charge.

BTW, the most mileage I have gotten from a single engine with this method before overhaul was 380,000.

My $0.02,
"Change oil hot and change oil often."
 

Ken

Gone but not forgotten
Joined
Jan 30, 2001
Messages
8,236
Location
Hermosa Beach, CA
Corvette
1987 Z51 Silver Coupe
Hear! Hear! I think EVERYBODY should follow Doc's advice. ;)

_ken :w

If you want to do something extra, I suggest that one takes the money they would have spent in these miracle additives and use it to change oil and filter more often.

Well spoken! :upthumbs
 

vigman

Motor head!!!!
Joined
Feb 13, 2001
Messages
3,471
Location
Valencia, CA,USA
Corvette
88 Convert ( SOLD ) /1973 coupe 4 speed/1964 Vert!
See what happens

When you do it RIGHT!

You go boy!

Vig!
 
Joined
May 29, 2002
Messages
8,655
Location
Missoura Ozarks
Corvette
2012 💯 4LT GS Roadster
what if . . .

. . . u have an old/high milage car, what is best then, oil or oil additive ?
 
L

LarryBible

Guest
I've seen people use STP and other thickening agents to stretch the life of an engine. I personally think this is, in most cases, false economy. The thickened oil will get the oil pressure up and sometimes make it use less oil.

On the other hand, unless the oil pressure is dangerously low, like 5 pounds or less, I feel that you're not accomplishing anything. The oil is thicker making more pressure, but also not as capable of flowing properly.

The over the road diesel engineers learned a long time ago to regulate the oil pressure at about fifteen pounds. They say anything above that is only wasting power and fuel.

If an engine is so sick, either on top or bottom, that it needs something like STP, it is definitely time for it to come apart. If you stretch it with these concoctions, you will find that engine probably needing more attention when it does come apart.

Answer to your question IMHO is that whatever oil is your favorite, as long as it is a premium oil, is what you should continue to use right on through 'til rebuild time.

I think these oils that are marketed for high mileage engines are just that, marketing. They're just trying to cater to a niche with a product that their competitors have not yet offered.

My $0.02,
 

rdgfx3

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 25, 2001
Messages
202
Location
Rowlett,TX.
Corvette
2008 Silver Coupe
At this time I use Valvoline 10W-30.Since 40,000 miles.
I've thought about Mobil ONE,but feared it would slip past the seals.

How about a switch to a blend?Or at 120,000 miles,should I stick with the one I brung?
 
Y

yellowVette

Guest
oil additives !

well the ones i use on my vette is "Restore" in the silver can, and STP fuel injector cleaner.....

Restore works great !!! i always used it in my 86 Z28 and it gave back my compression and made it stop backfiring so i kow that stuff works...

had a friend who worked at a chevy shop....he recommended STP for the fuel...guess it works pretty good... on my readout im avg. 19.9 mpg so i guess it works !

i have 76K mi
 

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