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quartz clock conversion

J

jmp

Guest
My original clock doesn't work (like everyone elses ;) ) so I'm going to change to a quartz movement clock. Here's the question: should I buy a new (looks like original) quartz clock, or buy the conversion kit for half the price? Anybody have opinions on the conversion kit?
 
C

ccflorida

Guest
Conversion Kit

I bought the conversion kit .It was easy to install and works great.. Why pay double the price!!;)
 
Joined
Aug 29, 2001
Messages
3,234
Location
Norcross, Georgia, United Stat
Corvette
2017 Arctic White Grand Sport
I rebuit mine after reading numerous posts about the possibility of the face not matching the other gauges due to aging.

Keeps great time as long as I can keep the battery connected.:s

Bob
 

chuck

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 7, 2001
Messages
193
Location
Tallmadge,Ohio
Corvette
1977 Dark Red Coupe/Buckskin 04 Spiral Gray/Gray
Buy the conversion kit and just follow the instructions. Not that hard to do.:cool Chuck
 
B

baby blue 75

Guest
Clocks

I fixed mine by just removing the clock and running a piece of sandpaper accross the electricasl contacts, a faint mist of WD 40 and presto - clocko !
 
J

jmp

Guest
I'm finally getting to the clock (I figured why pull apart the dash while the sun is still out? Drive the car now, wait for the rains, then pull everything apart! )

I'm fairly certain the clock isn't getting power -- easy to check, just haven't gotten around to it yet -- but I thought I'd check the clock itself while I have it out. Anybody know how to do this? I wouldn't want to fry my clock by putting too much power to it!

PS. electrical neophyte here -- I'll be getting my dad (something of an electrician) to help with wiring problems!!
 

mytoy

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 15, 2001
Messages
103
Location
7259 west chester ohio 45069
Corvette
1978 L82 BLACK
My clock didn't work in my 78. got a good deal on a used one for ten dollars, installed it but it didn't work either after checking more closely it was the printed circuit
 

mvftw

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 19, 2002
Messages
343
Location
Long Island, NY
Corvette
'78 Real S/A, L82, 4spd
Mine works for awhile when I adjust it, then stops after a few hours. Needs cleaning/rebuild. Question...to get it out, just take off the gauge panel and unscrew the clock? Is there any tricks or straight forward?
 
J

jmp

Guest
jmp said:
I'm fairly certain the clock isn't getting power -- easy to check, just haven't gotten around to it yet -- but I thought I'd check the clock itself while I have it out. Anybody know how to do this? I wouldn't want to fry my clock by putting too much power to it!

Well, it seems that the clock is getting power -- about 10V. So, I guess I should be able to apply 10V to the clock just to verify that it doesn't work.

Looking at the wiring diagrams, it looks like the clock and the cigarette lighter light bulb connect to the same source, correct? Well it looks like the lighter light is getting about 2V, but while the bulb is working when I test it out of the car, it doesn't work in the car.

Last question/comment: How do I take the clock apart? I assume I'd have to do this to do a quartz conversion anyway, but I'd like to look at the insides prior to buying the kit, just in case something obvious is wrong and I can fix it without converting it.
 
S

smurfvet

Guest
I fixed mine last summer by using the cleaning and WD-40 method described above in another post. The clock has an aluminum cover that is held on with bent tabs, I think. There might be screws, I forgot. It will be evident when you get the clock out of the console. To get the cover off, I had to pull (very carefully!) The rubber insulator around the power connection just stays on the mechanism as you pull the aluminum can off.

You will see a little spring with two contacts. That's where the voltage is applied to wind up the little spring that makes the clock work. Clean these points, squirt some magic juice on them and hook the clock up to the power wire and ground it. The points should close, you will hear a "zip" as the spring winds and the clock should run. DO THIS BEFORE REINSTALLING!

Mine still works! All for 1 hour of fooling around.
 
J

jmp

Guest
Damn! Knew I should have brought the clock pics in so that I could upload them. OK, I'm going to have try and describe the clock, 'cause it doesn't sound the same as yours, smurfvet.

First, the clock looks like it is in great condition. I'm thinking it might not be original. Anyway, I've removed it from the console, but I haven't opened it up. There's one electrical contact on the back that was wired to a 10V power source. Is that the contact I'm supposed to clean and WD-40?

I could take the cover off by unbending the tabs, except for one problem... the hands of the clock. Removing this cover would separate the face from the rest of the clock, but the hands get in the way. How do I remove the hands?

You will see a little spring with two contacts.

I assume this is once I get to the clock innards?


Thx. I'll post pics tomorrow, if I remember.
 
S

smurfvet

Guest
No. The terminal on the outside of the clock back case is a 1/4" spade terminal that has a small nut holding it on. Remove that nut and terminal. You will have a small threaded stud with a rubber insulator sticking through the "can" after you remove the spade and nut.

Find the tabs holding the aluminum cover to the face and bend them up so you can slide the aluminum cover off. Once you get all the tabs loose on the aluminum can, it should pull right off. Unless you are changing the whole mechanism, you don't have to remove the hands. They supposedly pull off, but they were really tight on mine. I left them be.

Once you get the can off, you will see the little spring and the two contacts I was talking about. Look for the small wound spring that has a moveable arm on it. There will be one SMALL contact at the end of this moveable arm and one stationary one adjacent to it on another grounded arm. If the clock has stopped, the contacts will be apart what appears to be quite a distance, 1/4"or so. Rotate the moveable arm and you will see that it will touch the stationary contact point. Look for evidence of arcing or burning- usually the continued arcing is what causes the problem. My clock was doing this continually for 28 years, once every 5 minutes or so. It was smoked BAD.

Please post the pictures, I can give you some more info when I see them. I just can't remember how the aluminum can attached- old age! Make sure you get some shots of the back and side of the clock, as close as you can. That should work.
 
J

jmp

Guest
Ah, ok! I believe I understand now. Try it when I get home. The following link is my clock pics:

Clock Pics

The 3rd pic shows the rear terminal and the nut that I'll have to remove, while the 4th pic (kinda) shows the tabs, if I understand you correctly.

Thx.
 
S

smurfvet

Guest
The nut and tab in the third picture have to be removed for sure. Don't remove the rubber insulator under the tab- it comes off after you pull the cover or "can". I believe I remember what has to be done to remove that rear "can". Looking at the picture, the tabs from the front face plate that go to the base of the can have to be bent up and the face of the clock moved outward. Be careful not to bend the hands or the clock shafts when you do the next process.

Then, if you look at the bottom surface or largest diameter of the can, there is a "dimple" in the metal edge right above your thumb. The edge of the can is pushed in here to grab the base. I believe this is how the base of the clock is attached to the can. I took a small set of needle nosed pliers and bent the can lip out at these dimples to allow the base plate to pop out. All you need to do is grab the can at these dimples and pry up easily. The can lip will bend up. Don't bend it a lot, just get it even with the rest of the edge, no more. The edge of the can is dimpled in three or four places. Loosen up those dimples and the can cover should pull right off.

THEN you see the spring and contact.
 

8T8T2

Active member
Joined
Aug 29, 2002
Messages
35
Location
Golden, Colo., USA
Corvette
80 L-82 Silver / 82 Crossfire White-Silver
When I had mine out for repair I used a 9v battery to check operation. Just ran jumpers from battery to connections on clock. Ran all nite and day off of the little battery. After it was installed it ran for a month than went t-ts up. Will install a quartz conversion next time.
 
J

jmp

Guest
smurfvet said:
Once you get the can off, you will see the little spring and the two contacts I was talking about. Look for the small wound spring that has a moveable arm on it. There will be one SMALL contact at the end of this moveable arm and one stationary one adjacent to it on another grounded arm. If the clock has stopped, the contacts will be apart what appears to be quite a distance, 1/4"or so. Rotate the moveable arm and you will see that it will touch the stationary contact point. Look for evidence of arcing or burning- usually the continued arcing is what causes the problem. My clock was doing this continually for 28 years, once every 5 minutes or so. It was smoked BAD.

OK, more pics (at the bottom of the page) of the clock internals: Clock Pics

I can see the 2 contact points, and they are about 1/4" apart. Both are moveable, though. One (closest to the viewer, in the pics) only moves 1/4" until it touches the opposite point, while the other point rotates all the way back (see the 6th pic -- 2nd internal clock pic) then 'ticks' forward again, moving the clock hands.

When I apply power, nothing happens -- unless I move the first point that 1/4" closer to the 2nd point. Then the electromagnet kicks in and keeps the two points touching. But that's it. Actually, the 1st point is magnetically stuck to the disc that the second point is attached to (the disc that the spring is also attached to) -- I can move the 2nd point back, apply power, then press down on the first point and it'll stick in place.

Anyway, I still don't know what is supposed to happen when power is applied. Somehow the point with the spring should wind back then tick forward so the hands move, but how?
 
S

smurfvet

Guest
You said that when you move the rear point (second one away from the viewer) back away from the first point (closest to the viewer) by hand, the clock runs, and as it is running, the moveable point eventually touches the "stationary point" (or close to it) . That is correct.

I don't know why they don't touch when the spring is wound down. If the "stationary" arm is moveable, move it until the contacts touch. My points were set up that when the spring was just about "wound down" , the contacts touched and the moveable point and arm drove backwards away from the stationary point. In 3 to 4 minutes, the spring was wound down enough for the contacts to touch again and the cycle repeated. This sounds like what is happening when you manually push the second contact and arm backwards.

If you are not getting movement with the contacts touching and power applied, clean the points with a new dollar bill or a slightly rough surface. The black pitting in the pictures can eventually insulate the points enough that they don't pass electricity. Don't use a file to clean the points, it will damage them. Also, in the picture, the points don't look in alignment (face to face). Try to straighten them if you can. As soon as the contacts touch with power applied, the moveable arm should move back rather quickly. That's the "click" you hear if the clock is working correctly. Also be sure to check that you have a good ground on the clock metal base. One post said to use a 9 volt battery to test with- that's a great idea.

If the clock winding mechanism still doesn't work, replace it. It sounds like you could have a damaged gear which doesn't allow the spring to move all the way through the normal distance, or the electric solenoid that forces the moveable arm back is fried. Rik's Corvette supply has them for about $50.
 
J

jmp

Guest
Well, it looks like my clock is hosed. It appears as though a bit of the plastic casing has melted enough that things get a little loose -- if the arm and points are all in the right place, the moveable arm does drive back a small amount. But because the case is no longer tight, things don't line up... long story short: clock doesn't work.

Looks like I can get a new mechanical clock kit for $50 or a quartz conversion for $60. I'm leaning towards the quartz conversion, but I need to know if the kit requires anything from the old clock other than the face, hands, and 'can'.
 
S

smurfvet

Guest
The front contact looked in the wrong position in your picture, and I know mine didn't move. Now that you said there is some form of heat damage, it makes sense. You're right- it fried.

Buy the quartz conversion kit, it will resolve the issue the best. Just be careful with the hands.
 
S

smurfvet

Guest
I checked my catalogs (Ecklers, MAD and Rik's)- it appears all the "guts" are included. Your list of things you need seems correct.
 

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