Welcome to the Corvette Forums at the Corvette Action Center!

1980 Brakes & Rear

S

sac001

Guest
OK, I started a rear end job on my 80 4 speed a month ago, and I'm now getting everything back from the shop to reinstall.

My first question is, when installing new Brake Hoses into the refurbished Calipers, should I put anything on the threaded part of the hoses (teflon tape, anti-seize or the like)?

I will replace the brake fluid with new silicone type, is there a specific brand I should look for?

I'm replacing all the Calipers, rubber brake hoses (with Stainless Steel braided), have had the T-Arms, axle half shafts and differential refurbished. I'm sticking with the original spring, and replacing all the associated hardware and bushings/cushions.

Any suggestions will be apreciated.

Thanks,
Steve :w
 
S

Scott81

Guest
OK, I started a rear end job on my 80 4 speed a month ago, and I'm now getting everything back from the shop to reinstall.

Let the fun begin!

My first question is, when installing new Brake Hoses into the refurbished Calipers, should I put anything on the threaded part of the hoses (teflon tape, anti-seize or the like)?

No. But do be careful threading things together. I had a stipped bleader screw once, it was so minor it took 4 hours to figure out why the brakes wouldn't work and it couldn't be fixed so I had to exchange it.

I will replace the brake fluid with new silicone type, is there a specific brand I should look for?

It's not necessary to use silicone fluid unless you are using the car for something that will heat up the breaks and fluid. I've talked with the people at Vette Brakes, Van Steel and others and they've told me that the one thing GM did right was the brake system. Most people use silicone fluid because it won't damage paint like the regular stuff will.

I'm replacing all the Calipers, rubber brake hoses (with Stainless Steel braided), have had the T-Arms, axle half shafts and differential refurbished. I'm sticking with the original spring, and replacing all the associated hardware and bushings/cushions.

Good idea. If you are replacing the calipers and adding braided lines you might also want to get new rotors and the stainless e-brake parts as well. A good place to talk to about your trailing arm-brakes-suspension is Van Steel. If you are replacing the bushings yourself and using the poly ones go down to a marine supply store and get a small tube of marine grease instead of buying the overpriced stuff that suspension places sell. And by all means if you try and replace the upper bushings on the differential support.....pay someone to do it and save your sanity. That's all I can think of. :D

Any suggestions will be apreciated.

Thanks,
Steve :w
 

fastglass95

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 27, 2001
Messages
208
Location
St. Peters, MO.
Corvette
1996 LT4 coupe + 2004 Z06 Z16
All I can add is:
1) when your done, post here on how it went so the rest of us can learn by any mistakes you may or may not make.:TALK

2) I'd stay away from the "silicone" brake fluid if it was my car. Many people do like it, but many more do not, including G.M. !

3) :drink :hb :drink :hb :mad :eek :drink "HAVE FUN"
 
W

wolf_walker

Guest
On the brake fluid, I decided agenst silicone mostly due to knowing that somewhere, sometime, the woman I built the car for will have someone else check the brake fluid and they will dump in whatever is handy.

I did however run DOT4 spec fluid, it has a higher boiloing point and is in general a "better" DOT 3, and can be mixed with DOT 3. It's spec'd by many euro manufactures like Mbenz and the like, I've never gone wrong folowing there lead, they usually know what there doing. :)

DO flush the system often, like yearly or so. Do that and a brakeing system will last MUCH longer..
 
S

sac001

Guest
OK, thanks for the info, I'll scratch the Silicone Brake Fluid idea, and look into the Dot 4 spec fluid.

The T-Arms have been done by the same place that did the Differential and Calipers, Precision Engineering in Florida. They have this Sleeved O-Ring design that looks real good. ( http://www.fixvetteparts.com )

I'm going to leave the Carrier Bushings alone, they look fine.

Next dumb question, when putting the Differential back into the Carrier, what should I use for glue/adhesive to hold the gasket in place?

Thanks again for the info, I hope to start re-construction this weekend, and I'll keep you updated on my progress.

Steve :w
 
W

wolf_walker

Guest
Silicone/RTV, 3M adhesive, or my personal favorite that you never see anymore, Indian Head gasket Shellack. :)

Silicone works well, use sparingly so as not to have a bunch on the inside once you torque down the two parts.
 
S

sac001

Guest
Re-building

Well, I started the re-assembly this weekend, and so far, so good.

The differential is in, fluid & additive and all. The only tricky part there was I should have installed the forward mount bushings before I hung the differential carrier on the frame. There is very little clearance once the unit is hung back in the car, and the new polyurethane bushings are a bit of a tight fit.

Also I decided to put the fluid & additive in while it was on the bench, instead of doing it under the car, much easier.

The T-Arms are partially installed. The forward bolts are in but the shims and rear mounts aren't done yet. Pretty straightforward so far, except I learned the best thing is to get the bolt started before trying to hold the T-Arm in place to bolt it up. Also,I'm glad I checked to see if the bolt fit thru the new forward bushings on the T-Arms, before putting them in the car. They were very tight, and I worked them thru the T-Arm a few times (with a little white lube) then they went in easy. I still have to install the new shims and tighten everything down.

The re-built Calipers are on the front, and the Stainless Steel brake lines are also on all four corners. Only trick here,is on the front, attach the line to the caliper while on the bench, then connect to the hard line after the caliper is bolted up.

Later this week I hope to get back under the car and continue re-assembly. If anyone has any advice, I'd be glad to hear it.

Oh,and Scott81, the T-Arms were re-built with new SS E-Brake hardware and shoes.

Steve :w :w
 
S

sac001

Guest
Progress Report

This weekend I made some real progress. The Differential is now in and torqued. Both T-Arms are in and torqued. The Spring is in, and bolted up to the Left T-Arm, I'm waiting for a new RH Lower Shock Mount before I can put that side together.

(By the way, the forward differential mount bolt absolutely needs to be torqued before installing the drive shaft. With the drive shaft in, there is no way to get anything in there to hold the bolt head while trying to torque the nut!)

Interesting to note, you really need to attach the Torque Control Arm to the Spindle before attaching the Leaf Spring. Otherwise, you can't maneuver the Spindle enough to get the Arm attached. Found that the hard way too.

Started bleeding the brakes last night, and am putting in Dot 4 spec fluid as suggested. I probably need about 3 more pints to get that all flushed out, but the pedal is coming up nicely. Also figured out on the rear brakes, that it is best to bleed the inboard bleeder before trying to bleed the outboard one.

Anyone have any suggestions on grease for the half shafts? The U-Joints are new, and I still need to grease them, and was wondering what type grease I should get, if anything specific or not.

After this, I'll send her out for a four-wheel alignment, and the world will again be in balance!

Steve :w
 
W

wolf_walker

Guest
I think I just used a good brand standard U-joint grease for all the joints. I do recall haveing to make sure the grease fittings were oriented so that I could get to them when there mounted.

Glad things are comeing together. :)
 
Joined
Nov 4, 2000
Messages
947
Location
Scottsville, Kentucky
Corvette
08 Jetstream Blue Z51 coupe
High temp wheel bearing grease suitable for use with disc brakes is likely the best choice. But like has been said any good lube will work well.

Dale
 
S

sac001

Guest
Thanks for the suggestions Dale & Wolf.

I went out yesterday and bought a new grease gun and tube of Mobile1 Synthetic Grease, went home last night and after finishing bleeding the brakes, tried out the grease gun & no dice. :mad

I'll have to replace it today and try again. :hb

All that's left is to install a new lower shock mount (when it arrives), put the tires back on, and get the alignment done.

After taking a good look around last night, I can't believe I've actually done it. Without the help I received here, there is no way I ever would have even tried! :beer

Thanks to all! :drink

Steve :w
 

Corvette Forums

Not a member of the Corvette Action Center?  Join now!  It's free!

Help support the Corvette Action Center!

Supporting Vendors

Dealers:

MacMulkin Chevrolet - The Second Largest Corvette Dealer in the Country!

Parts/Accessories:

Vetteskins

Advertise with the Corvette Action Center!

Double Your Chances!

Partners

Top Bottom