Welcome to the Corvette Forums at the Corvette Action Center!

Convertible Rear Window - How to Refasten: Copied from CF

Joined
May 29, 2002
Messages
8,596
Location
Missoura Ozarks
Corvette
Carbon Flash CE 4LT GS Roadster
My 2001 convertible is my everyday car. I drive it in rain, snow and good weather. It is and always has been garaged. Three weeks ago at about 128,000 miles the back glass window separated from the top. The separation first started at the top and when it got to the sides and started separating at the bottom I stopped driving it.

I’ve done lots of research on this site and others (including BMW, Audi and other convertible top postings). The results are that upholstery people usually say the sealing process is high pressure done under heat at the factory and there is no way to duplicate it in the field so you have to replace the top. Estimates for top replacement range from lows in the area of $500 to $1000 to a high of $3000 with the average being $1000 to $1500.

Some people report glue attempts with total failures after days or weeks. Others report glue success and the glue holding after much longer times.

Those reporting glue success used a variety of glues including: JB Weld, Black silicone RTV sealant, pure clear silicone sealer, 3M high black weatherstrip adhesive, and urethane windshield glue. One person posted that he used a cyanoacrylate glue that he got at a hobby shop. Super glue and its various other names are cyanoacrylate glues.

I did my own research and settled on Rhino Glue which is a specially formulated cyanoacrylate that is waterproof, weatherproof and completely resistant to heat and cold. See www.rhinoglue.com for more information.



I was not able to find this glue in any store and bought it online. This is a totally different glue than Liquid Nails Rhino Ultra Glue. Do not buy the Liquid Nails kind.

Here are pictures of what the separation looked like before I started gluing.

The first one was taken when the separation first started. Compare it with the ones below with the suction cups and you can see the progression of the separation down the side with just a little more driving.

My advice is to catch it before the window comes completely loose.









These round red things are suction dent pullers.






I found these online. They come in a 1, 2, 3 or 4 suction cup variety. www.cvfsupplycompany.com/sucusucupdep3.html. I bought the 4 cup variety without thinking. I got 2 of them (only needed one in the end) for $30 and that included the shipping. When they arrived, I realized that they were too large for the window so I cut them in half. A better choice would have been either the 2 cup or 3 cup ones. I then rigged up a way to pull them so that the glass would be pulled against the fabric. You can see that this simply involved screwing an eye into the rafter above.



I found that if I unlatched the top and lifted it about a foot that it relieved the stretched fabric enough to manually push it against the glass. Note the rubber mallet I used to hold the front of the top up.



I then applied the glue around the glass about 3 to 6 inches at a time. Be careful and test this out before you apply the glue. I made the mistake of starting on the sides and moving toward the middle and was left with a significant bunching at the middle. The glue set up so fast that I actually had to cut the top away from the glass at the corner to smooth out the bunching. At the finish of the job, I was still left with a little bunching at the drivers side. As I’m not a perfectionist and it isn’t very noticeable, I haven’t tried to correct it.

This is the finished job before I removed the dent pullers.



I did the job at 7 PM and left the suction cups attached until the next morning at about 8 AM. I then drove the car to an automated carwash which I figured would be a great test for the bonding strength. It came through with flying colors - no separation of the window from the top and no sign of leaking.

I then drove it 50 miles with no sign of any separation.

If the glue is as advertised, judging by the part I had to remove and redo, I expect it will hold up for a very long time.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

XLR8

Gone but not forgotten
Joined
Jun 23, 2004
Messages
6,662
Location
Mississippi Gulf Coast
Corvette
2003 AE Convertible, 1998 LCRM Convertible
Wish I'd seen this a year ago... would've saved me about $1600. ;squint: Live and learn.

Good post Shooter and considering our C4 and C5 convertibles are getting older everyday, probably a timely one too.

:wJane Ann
 

04 Commemorative

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 29, 2004
Messages
290
Location
New Jersey
Corvette
04 Commemorative Conv. 6 speed
It amazes me what people can think of and come up with....hats off to you!
:w:BOW
 
R

roxeye1

Guest
Wish I'd seen this a year ago... would've saved me about $1600. ;squint: Live and learn.

Good post Shooter and considering our C4 and C5 convertibles are getting older everyday, probably a timely one too.

:wJane Ann


Amen to that J.A.! I joined this site 2 weeks too late! Cost me $1200. The top company told me the window couldn't be repaired....BY THEM!!!
 
Joined
Jan 19, 2003
Messages
3,021
Location
5,800 feet above sea level
Corvette
2006 'Evil Stealth Black' Roadster
I'm convinced. I think this thread is topical enough that we ought to make it "sticky" at the top of the forum, as a resource to other C5 'Vert owners.

-Patrick
 

XLR8

Gone but not forgotten
Joined
Jun 23, 2004
Messages
6,662
Location
Mississippi Gulf Coast
Corvette
2003 AE Convertible, 1998 LCRM Convertible
I'm convinced. I think this thread is topical enough that we ought to make it "sticky" at the top of the forum, as a resource to other C5 'Vert owners.

-Patrick

I agree Patrick... I bookmarked it in a special folder a couple of weeks ago so that I could easily access it for the next member that posts the Convertible Blues.

:w
 

tankman

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 5, 2003
Messages
173
Location
motor city
Corvette
1998 pace car,Impala, duramax, STS, k5
WOW is that cool!

Wow is that cool!!
Great work six shooter, takes a lot of imagination to come up with that.

The rear window in my '98 started to seperate this spring just as you described. I used the 3M marine sealant. Serious stuff! I spread a thin bead around the mating areas (once cleaned) and then pressed the window back into the place it belongs, without opening the top. I then used a couple of rolls of duct tape to wedge inbetween the tonneau cover and the rear window, all inside the car. It took aome manipulating to get them to set still, but then left for about a week. The 3M adhesive was thin enough to seal with the remaining factory seal to be watertight . It lasted for months of washing until it was replaced after a deer horn pierced it. The repair place charged $1500.

Best of luck!!

Eric
 

Ron Furgerson

New member
Joined
Jul 31, 2007
Messages
4
Location
Fairfax, VA
Corvette
2002 Dark Red Coupe
Great fix

My brother's 2000 failed rear window was just recently replaced with a vinyl window sewn in at an upholstery shop for $300.00 which has been satisfactory -- but I think not as good your fix. For one thing, he lost the use of the heated defroster and the vinyl will certainly cloud-up at some time in the future. And, of course, it is not the original design. Still, it works for my brother and he is pleased with it. And, it will always be possible to return to the original. What is aggravating is the fact that the design of the convertable top could have prevented this type of common problem. A slight realignment of the supporting tubes could have obviated the extreme pressure which hastens the fabric separation.
 

ken-o

New member
Joined
Oct 21, 2009
Messages
1
Location
Destin, Fl
Corvette
1998 Black conv
This will NOT work. I went through this exact procedure and it will hold for several months. Glue gets hard and releases window.

I have designed a 2 piece clamp that will surround the window and hold.

Still in prototype but once installed will fix.

This will be a color matched 2 piece predrilled bracket . Holes will be drilled trough the soft part of top .

Hollow top will go through and be screw from inside..and hold original glass.

Watch for it. Try E-6000 for another fix...It is more resillient




Convertible Rear Window - How to Refasten - Corvette Forum

My 2001 convertible is my everyday car. I drive it in rain, snow and good weather. It is and always has been garaged. Three weeks ago at about 128,000 miles the back glass window separated from the top. The separation first started at the top and when it got to the sides and started separating at the bottom I stopped driving it.

I’ve done lots of research on this site and others (including BMW, Audi and other convertible top postings). The results are that upholstery people usually say the sealing process is high pressure done under heat at the factory and there is no way to duplicate it in the field so you have to replace the top. Estimates for top replacement range from lows in the area of $500 to $1000 to a high of $3000 with the average being $1000 to $1500.

Some people report glue attempts with total failures after days or weeks. Others report glue success and the glue holding after much longer times.

Those reporting glue success used a variety of glues including: JB Weld, Black silicone RTV sealant, pure clear silicone sealer, 3M high black weatherstrip adhesive, and urethane windshield glue. One person posted that he used a cyanoacrylate glue that he got at a hobby shop. Super glue and its various other names are cyanoacrylate glues.

I did my own research and settled on Rhino Glue which is a specially formulated cyanoacrylate that is waterproof, weatherproof and completely resistant to heat and cold. See www.rhinoglue.com for more information.



I was not able to find this glue in any store and bought it online. This is a totally different glue than Liquid Nails Rhino Ultra Glue. Do not buy the Liquid Nails kind.

Here are pictures of what the separation looked like before I started gluing.

The first one was taken when the separation first started. Compare it with the ones below with the suction cups and you can see the progression of the separation down the side with just a little more driving.

My advice is to catch it before the window comes completely loose.









These round red things are suction dent pullers.






I found these online. They come in a 1, 2, 3 or 4 suction cup variety. www.cvfsupplycompany.com/sucusucupdep3.html. I bought the 4 cup variety without thinking. I got 2 of them (only needed one in the end) for $30 and that included the shipping. When they arrived, I realized that they were too large for the window so I cut them in half. A better choice would have been either the 2 cup or 3 cup ones. I then rigged up a way to pull them so that the glass would be pulled against the fabric. You can see that this simply involved screwing an eye into the rafter above.



I found that if I unlatched the top and lifted it about a foot that it relieved the stretched fabric enough to manually push it against the glass. Note the rubber mallet I used to hold the front of the top up.



I then applied the glue around the glass about 3 to 6 inches at a time. Be careful and test this out before you apply the glue. I made the mistake of starting on the sides and moving toward the middle and was left with a significant bunching at the middle. The glue set up so fast that I actually had to cut the top away from the glass at the corner to smooth out the bunching. At the finish of the job, I was still left with a little bunching at the drivers side. As I’m not a perfectionist and it isn’t very noticeable, I haven’t tried to correct it.

This is the finished job before I removed the dent pullers.



I did the job at 7 PM and left the suction cups attached until the next morning at about 8 AM. I then drove the car to an automated carwash which I figured would be a great test for the bonding strength. It came through with flying colors - no separation of the window from the top and no sign of leaking.

I then drove it 50 miles with no sign of any separation.

If the glue is as advertised, judging by the part I had to remove and redo, I expect it will hold up for a very long time.
 

Tomrw

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 1, 2002
Messages
156
Location
Columbia, MD
Corvette
2000 Black Conv. Bassani Exhaust.
The method I used see link above on my last post to this thread. The fix lasted about one year the first time. I repeated the method after cleaning off the old RTV and it once again is holding. Tom
 

joelgjoel

Active member
Joined
Mar 2, 2008
Messages
30
Location
Sunny South Florida
Corvette
2002 Torch Red Convertible
I used two-part epoxy. Propped up the front, cleaned the glass, put a bead of epoxy around and then jammed two broom sticks inside from behind the seat to the glass to hold it in place a couple of bricks on the outside for opposing pressure. The next day it was cured and has endured over a year and 150 mph. I have faith in my fix and it was the most inexpensive. Epoxy is a strong adhesive.
 
E

E-Chick

Guest
Worked for me, thanks 6 Shooter!

My 2000 convertible had always been garaged up until 2008. Since then, we moved and it has only been under a carport. We currently live in Ramona, California. We get 100+ degree, dry summer weather, winters into the 20's at night, and it is quite often windy. In the summer of 2009, my rear window detached as I was washing the car. I'm certain that it is from these weather conditions, and lack of garage.

I did a search and came right to this thread. I tried 6 Shooter's method exactly. Thanks to 6 Shooter's detailed post with pics, I was able to reattach my rear window. Worked like a charm! I was able to drive, wash, and put top up and down for 2 years without a leak! VERY happy with the results. I figured, if it lasted a few months that would be great - I'd just reglue as necessary.

A few days ago it partially detached again. I was able to detach the window completely by gently pushing around it from the outside. I'm not in the position to replace the convertible top and window, so, I am trying the same method again - only using Gorilla glue this time (couldn't find Rhino glue at the store). Once again, I cleaned around the window and convertible top edge, partially propped open the convertible top, applied a bead of Gorilla glue around the entire perimeter, applied the suction cups using tie-downs attached to the carport overhead beams, and placed some old throw pillows inside to give some extra support to window from inside the car. The instructions on the Gorilla glue state that the glue will expand - unlike Rhino glue, so I am nervous about this point. I would have order some Rhino glue online, but I do not have the time to wait for it.

I'll post the results after it sets and some time has passed.

Thanks again to the OP, you rock!!!
 

joelgjoel

Active member
Joined
Mar 2, 2008
Messages
30
Location
Sunny South Florida
Corvette
2002 Torch Red Convertible
Rear window repair

I used two-part epoxy. Propped up the front, cleaned the glass, put a bead of epoxy around and then jammed two broom sticks inside from behind the seat to the glass to hold it in place a couple of bricks on the outside for opposing pressure. The next day it was cured and has endured over a year and 150 mph. I have faith in my fix and it was the most inexpensive. Epoxy is a strong adhesive.

It's now over 2 1/2 years and my simple repair is as strong as new. Keep it simple. Buy the epoxy that is in a double tube and it squeezes out equal amounts and mix it. No need to buy suction cups and order glue online. Follow how I applied the pressure and that's all folks.
 

747jock

Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2011
Messages
7
Location
Yorktown, VA
Corvette
2001 Bowling Green 6-spd convertible
Glass repair on convertible top

I used the same special Rhino Glue technique that others have suggested, and it worked great on my top. I didn't have to build a special frame; I dispensed a bead of the stuff around the edge of the window where it had separated (basically the left 1/3rd of the window, in a "C" shape had separated). Then I pulled the top up most of the way and stuffed blankets and pillows behind the seats to make pressure on the glass from the inside. Pressed down the top fabric from outside the glass for a few minutes and then let the whole thing cure overnite. A few drips of the glue ran down the glass, but I was able to clean them up with acetone. It's been a month since I did the job and it appears to be holding very well, but I'll let you know if it fails anytime soon. So far I'm pleased with the results, and it has a good seal and no visible evidence of the repairs from the outside...
 
T

The Rabbi

Guest
Rear window repair

I'm glad you managed to do it simple like I did. Get out on an open rural highway and take it to 150 and see if it holds. :thumb
 

Henly

New member
Joined
Nov 18, 2013
Messages
1
Location
Atlanta
Corvette
1998 convertible Black on Black automatic trans
This method is a good one. I had the same problem. After following the directions below, including ordering the glue. So far so good two weeks and 0 problems. You can buy a dent puller at Harbor freight if you have one in the area. Two suction cup puller runs about $5.
Convertible Rear Window - How to Refasten - Corvette Forum

My 2001 convertible is my everyday car. I drive it in rain, snow and good weather. It is and always has been garaged. Three weeks ago at about 128,000 miles the back glass window separated from the top. The separation first started at the top and when it got to the sides and started separating at the bottom I stopped driving it.

I’ve done lots of research on this site and others (including BMW, Audi and other convertible top postings). The results are that upholstery people usually say the sealing process is high pressure done under heat at the factory and there is no way to duplicate it in the field so you have to replace the top. Estimates for top replacement range from lows in the area of $500 to $1000 to a high of $3000 with the average being $1000 to $1500.

Some people report glue attempts with total failures after days or weeks. Others report glue success and the glue holding after much longer times.

Those reporting glue success used a variety of glues including: JB Weld, Black silicone RTV sealant, pure clear silicone sealer, 3M high black weatherstrip adhesive, and urethane windshield glue. One person posted that he used a cyanoacrylate glue that he got at a hobby shop. Super glue and its various other names are cyanoacrylate glues.

I did my own research and settled on Rhino Glue which is a specially formulated cyanoacrylate that is waterproof, weatherproof and completely resistant to heat and cold. See www.rhinoglue.com for more information.



I was not able to find this glue in any store and bought it online. This is a totally different glue than Liquid Nails Rhino Ultra Glue. Do not buy the Liquid Nails kind.

Here are pictures of what the separation looked like before I started gluing.

The first one was taken when the separation first started. Compare it with the ones below with the suction cups and you can see the progression of the separation down the side with just a little more driving.

My advice is to catch it before the window comes completely loose.









These round red things are suction dent pullers.






I found these online. They come in a 1, 2, 3 or 4 suction cup variety. www.cvfsupplycompany.com/sucusucupdep3.html. I bought the 4 cup variety without thinking. I got 2 of them (only needed one in the end) for $30 and that included the shipping. When they arrived, I realized that they were too large for the window so I cut them in half. A better choice would have been either the 2 cup or 3 cup ones. I then rigged up a way to pull them so that the glass would be pulled against the fabric. You can see that this simply involved screwing an eye into the rafter above.



I found that if I unlatched the top and lifted it about a foot that it relieved the stretched fabric enough to manually push it against the glass. Note the rubber mallet I used to hold the front of the top up.



I then applied the glue around the glass about 3 to 6 inches at a time. Be careful and test this out before you apply the glue. I made the mistake of starting on the sides and moving toward the middle and was left with a significant bunching at the middle. The glue set up so fast that I actually had to cut the top away from the glass at the corner to smooth out the bunching. At the finish of the job, I was still left with a little bunching at the drivers side. As I’m not a perfectionist and it isn’t very noticeable, I haven’t tried to correct it.

This is the finished job before I removed the dent pullers.



I did the job at 7 PM and left the suction cups attached until the next morning at about 8 AM. I then drove the car to an automated carwash which I figured would be a great test for the bonding strength. It came through with flying colors - no separation of the window from the top and no sign of leaking.

I then drove it 50 miles with no sign of any separation.

If the glue is as advertised, judging by the part I had to remove and redo, I expect it will hold up for a very long time.
 

Corvette Forums

Not a member of the Corvette Action Center?  Join now!  It's free!

Help support the Corvette Action Center!

Win Both Corvettes!

Win Both Corvettes and Get Extra Bonus Tickets Now!

Supporting Vendors

Dealers:

MacMulkin Chevrolet - The Second Largest Corvette Dealer in the Country!

Parts/Accessories:

Dead Center Foundation

Vetteskins

Advertise with the Corvette Action Center!

Partners

Top Bottom