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Installing rear calipers need help

Z

zgator

Guest
I've never done brake work but it's time I learned.I have to install my rear calipers.On a scale of 1-10 how hard is this.Does the parking brake come into play on this?Or better yet is there an archive someone can point me to?I've got both the shop manual and assy. manual.The shop manual hasn't been much help.They figure you allready know how to remove them so they just say remove calipers ect.
 

bossvette

Gone but not forgotten
Joined
May 19, 2003
Messages
3,233
Location
West Unity Ohio
Corvette
1968 1997
relativly simple, best to replace the soft lines and the two small hard lines while you are at it. A couple of bolts hold them on, take some brake fluid out of the master cylinder if you replace pads (might as well do it now) then bleed the brakes. The parking brakes are located inside the rear rotor, if you don't remove it you should be OK if the rotor is bad you might as well replace them also. A little project often grows once you start it; but why do the same labor twice.
 

zachh

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 1, 2005
Messages
221
Location
virginia beach, va
Corvette
1979 black 'n' silver L82 1978 Trans Am Y88
On the scale of 1 to 10, i would put it at a 3 or 4. When you bleed them, thats what makes it hard. Also, you can buy little clips that hold the brake pistons in when you change the pads. They help alot. I think they re called piston clips, im not 100% sure.
good luck.
Bossvette, ya need to post pics of yur new 68 and 82 collectors, i wanna see em. NICE 76!
zachh
 

srs244

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 1, 2005
Messages
462
Location
the deep south
Corvette
1978 pace car, 04 CE convert
if your parking brake and associated rear cable is functioning and in good shape, and assuming your rear rotors haven't worn to a dangerously thin thickness, then the caliper changeout (and only the caliper changeout) is a piece of cake. i would say 3-4 tops on a scale of 10. i do however agree that while you are at it you should change out the rubber brake hoses and the steel lines while you are at it. i would suggest that the lines be replaced with stainess ones as long as you are doing it. there are kits that include everything at several of the major part suppliers. you might want to consider that.
 
Z

zgator

Guest
Yeah.Good idea.When you mean major parts suppliers are you talking auto zone advance ect?
 

srs244

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 1, 2005
Messages
462
Location
the deep south
Corvette
1978 pace car, 04 CE convert
Yeah.Good idea.When you mean major parts suppliers are you talking auto zone advance ect?

personally, i was referring to someone that specializes in corvette supplies and parts like corvette america, corvette central, dr. rebuild, volunteer vette, etc. there are members here who specialize in high end replacement brake components. do a search and you should find everything you would want to know.
 
Joined
Apr 8, 2005
Messages
274
Location
Charleston, SC
Corvette
1981 Dark Blue Metallic, 2003 AE coupe
The first thing you want to do is mic and inspect the rear rotors. If they are in spec, then the job is pretty easy to replace the calipers, hoses, metal lines, and pads. If the rotors are worn below spec or have defects requiring them to be turned and they are still rivited on, then the scope increases a bit. If they're not rivited, then they have problably been turned once before and might be too thin to turn again. Typically you can get two shots at machining these puppies before they need to be replaced. The good news (or bad, depending on your perspective) is that if the rotors are not rivited, you can access the parking break internals easily and do whatever needs to be done with that. For bleeding afterward, the use of a power bleeder is worth the money. Keep in mind that the rear calipers have two bleeder valves, one on each side of the rotor. Another thing to keep in mind is if you have the original lip seal calipers, they will always leak over time. If you consider replacing the calipers, go with the o-ring style piston. You will not be dissappointed. Good luck! :beer

Mike :pat
 
Z

zgator

Guest
Oh yeah, thats right. Thanks for reminding me.I've got to get all my facts right before I start.Don't want any suprises
 
Joined
Nov 23, 2002
Messages
1,060
Location
Motorcity USA
Corvette
1973 L-48 Coupe
Always good advise here at the CAC....

The only thing I would add is advise i recieved here from Rare81( Thanks Bud!), Go to the GM dealer and buy factory brand pads for your vette.
They seem to fit better and the typical squeek of old Chevy's brakes goes away.....
Chas:_rock
 
Z

zgator

Guest
The rotors are still well within spec.I had that checked when the shop did the Booster/MC change.The pads are new carbin matallic.I really wish I didn't need to change out both rears just because one of them has a messed up inside bleeder valve.The ones I have are SS/O-ringed from VB and are about three years old form what I see in all the paperwork I got from the previous owner.Thanks for all your help.This place is priceless!!!
 

bossvette

Gone but not forgotten
Joined
May 19, 2003
Messages
3,233
Location
West Unity Ohio
Corvette
1968 1997
when my 76 broke off the bleeders I opened the bleeders to the next bigger size, access to a mill is required to do it though. any local machine shop should be able to do it.
 

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