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Needa help for a 1969

Needa69

New member
Joined
Nov 28, 2006
Messages
4
Location
Long Beach, NY
Hi my name is gavin and at one point in my life I owned a 1969-nom-corvette convertable and sold it for 4500 back in 1990 (as i kick myself in the #^*) but I am back and want to purchase another 1969 convertable but with origianl numbers. I did alot of research on it lately but I am still stuck on one thing. If any on can help me with this I would be very appreciative. The engine pad or code. I get the engine suffix ID number, its the letters and numbers that come before the suffix. I see some have TO and some have a VO (question; is the VO a factory replaced block). I would like to read up on this if any one has a web site or a book I can read on this. Main question how do you know if the stamps are real or fake. I was told be a close friend that they are very easy to stamp any number they want on the block. I dont want to spend 25k to find out I have be robbed.

Needa little help for a 1969 convertable
 

Vettehead Mikey

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 26, 2003
Messages
3,487
Location
Not that far from Ottawa
Corvette
1973 Coupe
Engine with a 'V' prefix were built in the Flint MI plant. Engine with 'T' prefix were built in the Tonawanda NY plant. For C3 Corvette applications, all small blocks were built in Flint and all big blocks were built in Tonawanda, no known exceptions. The four next digits represent the month and day that the engine was built. 0726 would be July 26th for example.

The comments about stamp pads being faked are true. It's very common in the hobby and some of them are very very good. Don't assume that just because all the correct numbers and codes are there (as well as authentic looking broaching machine marks) that it's real.

If you're after a high horse, high option '69, 25 grand won't get you too far. You may want to reconsider the need for 'matching numbers'.
 

Needa69

New member
Joined
Nov 28, 2006
Messages
4
Location
Long Beach, NY
Thanks

I used the 25 k for just a reference. I am seeing what the prices are and thats ok, But thanks that help a ton. If there is anything else I can learn off you guys. If there is anymore info that would make the tranaction smother that can help, it would be appreciated.
Thanks again
Gavin
Soon to be a 1969er. Love the way that sounds :D .
 

red70vette

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 22, 2003
Messages
328
Location
Cortlandt Manor,NY
Corvette
1970 red cpe 350/300
It takes a great deal of experience to tell a good restamp. Experience which unfortunately most of us don't have.

The best way to avoid a restamp is to buy a base engine car. High dollar cars are where you see most counterfits. I guess the theory is if you are going to defraud someone you may as well do it for big bucks. There are far more big block Corvettes today then the General ever built and most people can't tell the fakes. Paperwork is another way to aviod getting screwed but for a high dollar car that also can be faked easily. It is all a matter of effort needed to get a return. The more money the more effort.

Sometimes it is best not to buy a matching numbers car. It depends on what you want to do with it. If you are out for fun a NOM wil be just as much fun as any other car. If you are looking for an investment put your money in mutual funds. If you want to participate in NCRS or other judging clubs and events then you need to join the club, get educated, and take an expert with you when you want to buy something. That will reduce your chances of getting screwed.

Most of all have fun and drive it like you stole it.
 

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