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kpic

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Mar 29, 2014
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2,292
Location
Columbus, NC/NE Georgia
Corvette
1997 boosted silver coupe
I have reconditioned more cylinder heads in my lifetime than you've ever seen.

As I worked in Design Engineering for a powertrain manufacturer for 20 years; that is highly doubtable.

TBTR, when you don't know the other person; it's wise not to say such things.
 
Joined
Mar 9, 2009
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Location
Yemen
I am anxious to get my new Makita electric die grinder because of it's extended nose and it's electric power. My old Harbor Freight air-powered die grinder outruns my 5 hp compressor so it'll be nice to have an electric-powered die grinder. But I have read they get awfully hot with extended use so on a big job I can switch back and forth. To save some bucks I bought a used Makita that is actually new but has some cosmetic damage; probably a demonstrator that got boxed after it was displayed. I always buy used items from E-Bay because they're just as good but at less cost.

Air powered die grinders are okay but during the winter months they can get awfully cold..........cold to the point of spitting ice out of the exhaust ports.
 
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New Air Restriction Indicator Ordered

I also ordered a new air restriction indicator because the one I have been using was calibrated for turbocharged engines that can pull 25" of H2O...............way above the 8" H2O that naturally aspirated engines pull. As I live in an extremely dusty area I rely on the indicator to tell me when servicing is needed. Air filters last a LOT longer than most people realize and there's no sense (or gain) by replacing them too soon.
 

kpic

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 29, 2014
Messages
2,292
Location
Columbus, NC/NE Georgia
Corvette
1997 boosted silver coupe
Since we are discussing machinery and most of us have seen car magazines showing engine blocks and cylinder heads machined from billet or cast iron.

As this might be interesting to folks who have never worked or toured a automotive manufacturing plant. I hope it is interesting..

This is a machining center used to machine one block or head at a time..
http://www.centroidcnc.com/images/cnc_block/cnc_engine_block_machine_encl_800n.jpg
These are very versatile machines; if one has the fixtures, tools and programs, blocks or heads can be machine. Add skilled people and a lot of money also.

As one at a time would never supply the volumes GM needed; what does GM use?
These are modern transfer lines:
Examples : Transfer Line FTL / FMS : HORKOS CORP

Cylinder head line:
http://www.horkos.co.jp/english/products/mc/img/trfl_example01.jpg
It is 52m/170.5' long

Cylinder block line:
http://www.horkos.co.jp/english/products/mc/img/trfl_example02.jpg
It is 60M/196.85' long.

A transfer line or T-line is very specific purpose machine. A V8 line machines V8s and a I6 line machines I6s. Imagine how many T-lines GM has to own...


Basically in either, a rough casting goes in and a finished block or head comes out.

No, I can't operate one. :L

How many have you modified? Because that's not the same as reconditioning.

Good question.. :)
 
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The weather will be ideal starting this weekend so I am planning on diving into it on Friday or Saturday. The temperatures are supposed to be in the high 70's to mid 80's so the weather will be perfect. My Makita die grinder should arrive this morning and I have all my carbide burrs. I'm just lacking the 2-1/2" valve seat grinding stone and that should arrive in today's mail. So it looks like this weekend will be ideal.
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
Yemen
Holy Crap It's HUGE

My Makita electric die grinder arrived via USPS a while ago and when I un-boxed it I almost fainted. It's HUGE! I was expecting something around 8" to 9" long and maybe a pound in weight but this mother is 14" long and weighs at least 4 pounds. Here's some good advice for you guys..................I always buy used parts from E-Bay because used parts are a lot cheaper than "new" and they're usually in near-perfect condition. This die grinder was probably a display item in a Lowes or Home Depot and it doesn't even have a scratch on it. And the two wrenches that came with it are also in perfect condition. The only thing missing is the owner's manual and for the huge reduction in price I don't care. The total cost was $101 which is a good $20 to $30 cheaper than a new one plus I wasn't charged any shipping costs. So I advise buying used whenever you can to save money.

My 2-1/2" Black & Decker valve seat grinding stone also arrived this morning so now I have everything I need to tackle the job. I don't have anything going on at the moment so I think I'll pull my engine out tomorrow morning and get started. It usually takes me 3 to 3-1/2 hours to pull an engine out so by noon I'll be able to start the tear down. I think I'll replace my piston rings first to get that out of the way and then dive into my cylinder heads. I'll take a few pictures along the way so you can see what's involved in installing larger valves. As the big blocks and cylinder heads have such thick castings I shouldn't have any issues. I also have a whole set of new valve guides if needed so things should go along smoothly.

And the expected power gain? I don't know and don't care but I'm sure it will be enough to be noticed under full power and maybe even under normal day-to-day use. My magnum cam has a .556" lift at the valve so with the larger "window" it should breathe a lot easier at the upper rpm's.
 

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Joined
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Officially Started

I just drained the coolant and pulled the HEI out so I am officially in to it. The engine is too hot to continue so I'll blast into it tomorrow morning. I have pulled the engine out 2 times in the past without removing the hood but this time I'll remove it just to make the job easier. As I have an overhead chain hoist I can pull the engine part way up then move the car foreword. Then pull the engine higher while moving the car foreword and finally high enough to roll my car under it. Close the hood then push the car backwards and out from under the engine. So if anyone ever tells you the engine can't be pulled without removing the hood tell them they're wrong as I have done it more than once.
 

LLC5

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Joined
Sep 28, 2004
Messages
2,299
Location
Wa.
Corvette
98 black 6spd convert.
The total cost was $101 which is a good $20 to $30 cheaper than a new one plus I wasn't charged any shipping costs. So I advise buying used whenever you can to save money.



So, for $20.00 to $30.00 you could have bought a brand new Makita that comes with an owners manual AND a warranty?


You just talked me into buying new.
 

Antz81

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Joined
Dec 21, 2013
Messages
936
Location
Auckland, New Zealand
Corvette
1981 4 speed
I have pulled the engine out 2 times in the past without removing the hood but this time I'll remove it just to make the job easier. As I have an overhead chain hoist I can pull the engine part way up then move the car foreword. Then pull the engine higher while moving the car foreword and finally high enough to roll my car under it. Close the hood then push the car backwards and out from under the engine. So if anyone ever tells you the engine can't be pulled without removing the hood tell them they're wrong as I have done it more than once.

Sounds easier to just remove the hood.
 

kpic

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 29, 2014
Messages
2,292
Location
Columbus, NC/NE Georgia
Corvette
1997 boosted silver coupe
Sounds easier to just remove the hood.

It is easier.

However, using antifreeze and now mineral oil as grinding lubricant; we know TBTR likes doing things the hard way..

Imagine tasting antifreeze, ugh...
 

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